Author Archive

Interview: Eghigian on the History of Madness

As mentioned in an earlier post, Greg Eghigian has just published From Madness to Mental Health:  Psychiatric Disorder and its Treatment in Western Civilization (Rutgers University Press).  It is an edited collection of documents covering the history of madness and mental illness from ancient times to the present.  You can now hear a podcast interview with him about the book. Just click here

History of Bipolar Diagnosis in Children

National Public Radio has aired a story that examines the history of the increasing diagnosis of children with bipolar disorder in the United States.  The draft of the DSM-V that was just recently released attempts to mitigate against this trend with its proposal for a new diagnostic category: Temper Dysregulation Disorder.

You can access the NPR story at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123544191

United States v. Comstock

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments last month in the case of the United States v. Comstock.  The case involves establishing the limits of the state’s power to use civil commitment law to institutionalize sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences.  While the case heard before the Supreme Court largely centers on the more or less technical matter of whether the federal government may usurp individual states’ rights in this regard, it has brought national media attention to a development that has been on the rise on both sides of the Atlantic – the use of commitment laws and/or psychiatric facilities to detain convicts, most without a readily apparent diagnosis.  Over the course of the 20th century, countries have adopted a variety of approaches to this issue:  the Institution for Psychopathic Criminals in Denmark, social-therapeutic facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany, and, more recently, long-stay facilities in the Netherlands.

Read the transcript of the Supreme Court hearing here:  http://www.supremecourtus.gov/oral_arguments/argument_transcripts/08-1224.pdf

From Madness to Mental Health

Available beginning February 15, this anthology of primary sources chronicles the history of madness and psychiatry in western civilization, from ancient Israel to contemporary randomized clinical trials.  It also includes an updated bibliography of first-person narratives of mental illness compiled by Gail A. Hornstein. For more information click here.

To hear an interview with the author, click here.

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