Archive for the ‘ book ’ Category

New Book: “Homo Cinematicus” (Andreas Killen)

Homo CinematicusHomo Cinematicus
Science, Motion Pictures, and the Making of Modern Germany

Andreas Killen

Andreas Killen, Professor of History at the City College of New York and the CUNY Graduate Center (and H-Madness co-editor), has a new book out entitled Homo Cinematicus. Science, Motion Pictures, and the Making of Modern Germany with University of Pennsylvania Press.

In the early decades of the twentieth century, two intertwined changes began to shape the direction of German society. The baptism of the German film industry took place amid post-World War I conditions of political and social breakdown, and the cultural vacuum left by collapsing institutions was partially filled by moving images. At the same time, the emerging human sciences—psychiatry, neurology, sexology, eugenics, industrial psychology, and psychoanalysis—began to play an increasingly significant role in setting the terms for the way Germany analyzed itself and the problems it had inherited from its authoritarian past, the modernizing process, and war. Moreover, in advancing their professional and social goals, these sciences became heavily reliant on motion pictures.

Situated at the intersection of film studies, the history of science and medicine, and the history of modern Germany, Homo Cinematicus connects the rise of cinema as a social institution to an inquiry into the history of knowledge production in the human sciences. Taking its title from a term coined in 1919 by commentator Wilhelm Stapel to identify a new social type that had been created by the emergence of cinema, Killen’s book explores how a new class of experts in these new disciplines converged on the figure of the “homo cinematicus” and made him central to many of that era’s major narratives and social policy initiatives.

Killen traces film’s use by the human sciences as a tool for producing, communicating, and popularizing new kinds of knowledge, as well as the ways that this alliance was challenged by popular films that interrogated the truth claims of both modern science and scientific cinema. In doing so, Homo Cinematicus endeavors to move beyond the divide between scientific and popular film, examining their historical coexistence and coevolution.

For more information about this book, click here.

New book – A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought

9781316628133

The book A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought could be of interest to H-Madness readers. The book is written by Chiara Thumiger and is published by Cambridge University Press. The abstract on the publishers website reads: 

The Hippocratic texts and other contemporary medical sources have often been overlooked in discussions of ancient psychology. They have been considered to be more mechanical and less detailed than poetic and philosophical representations, as well as later medical texts such as those of Galen. This book does justice to these early medical accounts by demonstrating their richness and sophistication, their many connections with other contemporary cultural products and the indebtedness of later medicine to their observations. In addition, it reads these sources not only as archaeological documents but also in the light of methodological discussions that are fundamental to the histories of psychiatry and psychology. As a result of this approach, the book will be important for scholars of these disciplines as well as those of Greek literature and philosophy, strongly advocating the relevance of ancient ideas to modern debates.

 

This information was retrieved from the website Historiens de la santé

 

New Book: C. Thumiger, A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought

 

41lXm73o0cL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_

Historian Chiara Thumiger – Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Fellow in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick and a Gastwissenschaftlerin in the Department of Classical Philology at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin – has just published a new book with Cambridge University Press entitled A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought. The description reads:

The Hippocratic texts and other contemporary medical sources have often been overlooked in discussions of ancient psychology. They have been considered to be more mechanical and less detailed than poetic and philosophical representations, as well as later medical texts such as those of Galen. This book does justice to these early medical accounts by demonstrating their richness and sophistication, their many connections with other contemporary cultural products and the indebtedness of later medicine to their observations. In addition, it reads these sources not only as archaeological documents but also in the light of methodological discussions that are fundamental to the histories of psychiatry and psychology. As a result of this approach, the book will be important for scholars of these disciplines as well as those of Greek literature and philosophy, strongly advocating the relevance of ancient ideas to modern debates.

 

New book – 10th edition of Kaplan & Sadock’s Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry

90d86a1c-32e9-4535-9f29-43aac9521f30

The 10th edition of Kaplan & Sadock’s Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry includes a chapter about the history of psychiatry written by Edward Shorter that might be of interest to H-Madness readers.

 

 

 

 

New book – Vagueness in Psychiatry

9780198722373

The book Vagueness in Psychiatry could be of interest to H-Madness readers. It is edited by Geert Keil, Lara Keuck, and Rico Hauswald, and published by Oxford University Press. The abstract reads:

In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of subthreshold disorders and of the prodromal stages of diseases are notoriously contentious.

Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, vague. Although blurred boundaries between the normal and the pathological are a recurrent theme in many publications concerned with the classification of mental disorders, systematic approaches that take into account philosophical reflections on vagueness are rare. This book provides interdisciplinary discussions about vagueness in psychiatry by bringing together scholars from psychiatry, psychology, philosophy, history, and law. It draws together various lines of inquiry into the nature of gradations between mental health and disease and discusses the individual and societal consequences of dealing with blurred boundaries in medical practice, forensic psychiatry, and beyond.

Part I starts with an overview chapter that helps readers to navigate through the philosophy of vagueness and through the various debates surrounding demarcation problems in the classification and diagnosis of mental illness. Part II encompasses historical and recent philosophical positions on gradualist approaches to health and disease. Part III approaches the vagueness of present psychiatric classification systems and the debates concerning their revision by scrutinizing controversial categories such as post-traumatic stress disorder and by looking into the difficulties of day-to-day diagnostic and therapeutic practice. Part IV finally focuses on social, moral, and legal implications that arise when being mentally ill is a matter of degree.

 

 

New Book: “The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences. Technique, Technology, Therapy” (Ed. by Stephen T. Casper and Delia Gavrus)

9781580465953The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences. Technique, Technology, Therapy 

Edited by Stephen T. Casper and Delia Gavrus

University of Rochester Press
Format: Hardback

June 2017
318 pages

How did technicians, epidemics, zoos, German exiles, methamphetamine, disgruntled technicians, modern bureaucracy, museums, and whipping cream shape the emergence of modern neuroscience?
This history explores the exceptionally complex scientific and medical techniques and practices that have allowed practitioners to claim expertise in the brain and mind sciences over the past two centuries. Based on meticulous historical studies, essays in the volume move from the postrevolutionary Parisian Menagerie of the Jardin des Plantes to the political contexts of neuroscience within the National Institute of Mental Health in the United States in the late twentieth century. Touching on such disparate topics as the luggage of German exiles, the role of whipping cream in industrial food production, the emergence of neurosurgery, and the private musings of a disgruntled medical technician, the contributors to this volume make a powerful case for concentrating scholarly attention on seemingly marginal chapters of the history of the mind and brain sciences. By so doing, the authors contend that it is in the obscure, peripheral, and marginal stories of the past that we can best see the emerging futures of the medicine and science of the brain and the mind. Collectively these essays thus reveal that the richness of the history of the brain and mind sciences cannot and should not be reduced to a unitary, uncomplicated narrative of progressive discovery.
CONTRIBUTORS: Brian P. Casey, Stephen T. Casper, Justin Garson, Delia Gavrus, Katja Guenther, L. Stephen Jacyna, Kenton Kroker, Thomas Schlich, Max Stadler, Frank W. Stahnisch
Stephen Casper is Associate Professor of History at Clarkson University. Delia Gavrus is Assistant Professor of the History of Science at the University of Winnipeg.

New book – Screwing Around with Sex: Essays, indictments, anecdotes and asides

41cXG4cRJZL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

The book Screwing Around with Sex: Essays, indictments, anecdotes and asides might be of interest to H-Madness readers as it includes two chapters (chapter 1 and 4) on the history of sexual rights related to deinstitutionalisation and consent for disabled adults. The book is written by Paul R. Abramson and published by Asylum 4 Renegades Press.

The description reads:

This book explains the inexplicable: sexual assault on campus, affirmative consent, sexual violence against vulnerable populations, sexual rights, obscenity, and the three fundamental truths of sex. It is written by a UCLA Psychology Professor who spent 40 years as an expert witness in criminal, civil, and constitutionally relevant litigation, while simultaneously immersed in cutting edge sex research. The public policy perspective that accrued from all of that work is a significant part of this book as well. Screwing Around with Sex ends intriguingly with a chapter on music and love.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: