Archive for the ‘ Call for Papers ’ Category

Call for Abstracts – Alcohol, Psychiatry and Society

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International Research Symposium – St Anne’s College, Oxford, 29 – 30 June 2017

The medicalisation of alcohol use has become a prominent discourse that guides policy makers and impacts public perceptions of alcohol and drinking. This symposium intends to map the historical and cultural dimensions of these phenomena. Emphasis is on medical attitudes and theories regarding alcohol and the changing perception of alcohol consumption in the fields of psychiatry and mental healing. The intention is to explore the shift from the use of alcohol in clinical treatment, as part of dietary regimens, incentive to work and reward for desirable behaviour during earlier periods to the emergence of alcoholism as a disease category that requires medical intervention, is covered by medical insurance and considered as a threat to public health. Continue reading

Thinking in Cases – call for submissions to History of the Human Sciences

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

As part of our celebration of the work of the incomparable John Forrester, History of the Human Sciences (HHS) is hosting a review symposium around John’s final work: Thinking in Cases (Polity: 2017). The first essay in this collectionwas originally published in HHS back in 1996: (http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/095269519600900301)

As part of our efforts to showcase the work of new and emerging scholars, HHS invites expressions of interest from all early career researchers (a flexible definition) whose work bears in some way upon the work John started with ‘Thinking in Cases’. We welcome anyone who would like to contribute to such a dialogue with John’s work, and with each other.

If interested, please send a short expression of interest (max 200 words) to the email address below, outlining your strengths as candidate for inclusion in such a review symposium. Depending upon response, we anticipate final contributions of c.3,000 words.

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Deadlines:

Expressions of Interest: Monday 13th March, 2017.

Submission of Contributions: 31st October, 2017.

Publication in HHS: 2018.

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If you have questions, please email Chris Millard: c[dot]millard[at]Sheffield[dot]ac[dot]uk

We look forward to hearing from you,

Felicity Callard (Editor-in-Chief) & Chris Millard (Reviews Editor)

CfP: Reading Bodies, Writing Minds (Nottingham, April 2017)


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13th April 2017

Location: Highfield House, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus

Reading Bodies, Writing Minds is a one-day conference to be held at the University of Nottingham on 13 April 2017. The conference will investigate representations from the arts and social sciences of suffering, seeing, and treating mental illness. This interdisciplinary event is intended to foster communication between different study areas and subjects and to that end we invite abstracts addressing historical and modern entanglements of medicine and the humanities. The conference’s two keynote speakers are Dr. Mary Ann Lund of the University of Leicester, specialising in Elizabethan-era melancholy, and Dr. Chantelle Saville of the University of Auckland, speaking on medieval theory of emotion.

For colleagues who wish to be considered to present a paper (not in excess of 20 minutes in length), please submit by 1st February 2017 an abstract of no more than 250 words outlining the paper and the area of research.

Submissions might include, but are not restricted to, the following topics:

  • Historical perspectives on mood and emotion.
  • Metaphors and artistic forms commonly or historically associated with mental health.
  • Modern treatments or analogues of historical artistic approaches to mental health.
  • How medical texts and texts about mental health and illness represent and construct their ideal reader.

All accepted papers will be considered for peer-review and potential publication in an edited volume of conference proceedings. This event is supported by funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Midlands 3 Cities organisation.

Abstracts should be sent to: MedicalHumanities2017@gmail.com.

For general enquiries: please email the above address and address to Martin Brooks.

Panelists wanted: Jewish Mysticism and the Psy-Disciplines, World Congress of Jewish Studies (Jerusalem 2017)

Beit Alpha Synagogue floor

Call for panelists for the World Congress of Jewish Studies (Jerusalem, August 6-10, 2017) 
Proposed panel: Jewish Mysticism and the Psy-Disciplines We are putting together a proposal for one session at the World Congress of Jewish Studies focused on  jewish mysticism and the psy-disciplines. We are looking for participants for a session on the relation between jewish mysticism and the psy-disciplines. We are looking for contributions discussing the influence of Jewish mystical thought on different psy-disciplines – psychology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy – in past and present, and for contributions that use perspectives of these disciplines to approach different aspects of Jewish mysticism, including mystical experiences, movements, and individuals. 
Please contact us for further information and/or send the title and an abstract of your paper by November 30th to: farina.marx@hhu.de or  david.freis@uni-muenster.de 
Farina Marx, M.A. Heinrich-Heine-Universität Institut für Jüdische Studien Universitätsstr. 1 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany) 
Dr. David Freis, M.A. Westfälische-Wilhelms-Universität Münster Institut für Ethik, Geschichte und Theorie der Medizin Von-Esmarch-Strasse 62 48149 Münster (Germany) 

Call for Abstracts: “Philosophical Perspectives on Critical Psychiatry” (San Diego, May 2017)

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Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry Call for Abstracts
29th ANNUAL MEETING, May 20-21, 2017
San Diego, California

Philosophical Perspectives on Critical Psychiatry: Challenges and Opportunities

Conference co-chairs: Christian Perring, Douglas Porter, and G. Scott Waterman

Critical Psychiatry is a wide-ranging movement that encompasses a highly varied, and possibly incommensurable, array of concepts, concerns, and activities. Broadly speaking, Critical Psychiatry has taken the profession to task for being a source of oppression, asserting that the power and authority of psychiatry functions to marginalize and disempower people who experience mental distress or extreme psychological states and/or use mental health services. Psychiatry has also been seen as a means of social control, serving to oppress communities that have already been marginalized due to race, gender, orientation, economic class, culture, ethnicity, or immigration status. Whether this oppression is conceived as an inevitable or contingent aspect of psychiatric practice, the concern for oppression has led Critical Psychiatry to focus attention on social, political, and ideological aspects of psychiatric theory and practice — topics not typically addressed in the mainstream discourse of the discipline. But critical psychiatry has also directly engaged conventional psychiatric thinking and practice, challenging empirical claims and methodologies, as well as interpretation of data.

For the purposes of this conference, Critical Psychiatry can be seen as fertile territory for an interdisciplinary engagement between philosophy and psychiatry. Critical Psychiatry has drawn upon the philosophical resources of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory to criticize the implicit positivism at work in mainstream psychiatry and the power/knowledge complexes discerned by Foucault to challenge entrenched notions of epistemic authority within psychiatry. The concern for oppression within Critical Psychiatry is shared by queer theory, feminist theory, and broader theoretical concerns with social justice. Critical Psychiatry’s challenge to the empirical claims of psychiatric science implicate matters of direct concern for the philosophy of science, while the relation between empirical and theoretical concerns that arise within Critical Psychiatry pose challenges to philosophy, in particular the traditional disciplinary division between the philosophy of science and political and moral philosophy.

Possible topics for the conference include but are not limited to:

  • Is Critical Psychiatry best conceived of as a contemporary incarnation of “Anti-Psychiatry” or as a resource for psychiatric reform? Can psychiatry be emancipatory or is it inherently oppressive and coercive?
  • What should be the fundamental aims of psychiatry? Who should have the authority to formulate those aims?
  • How should we conceptualize madness and distress? Do certain ontological assumptions about the nature or “reality” of mental disorders inherently marginalize mental health service users?
  • What is the significance of empirical “sites of resistance” such as the psychiatric survivors’ movement?
  • What are the political and social dimensions of a “biological psychiatry”?
  • Have biomedical conceptualizations of mental distress become hegemonic, both withinmedicine and in the wider society? If so, what are the implications of that hegemony for the prospects of improving care for people who seek it?
  • Is there an undue influence of Big Pharma and the Medical Industrial Complex on the production of psychiatric science? Are there means to responsibly address the inevitable influence of politics and economics on science? Does a politicization of science undermine scientific integrity and the concern for, or claim to, objectivity
  • Are the philosophical assumptions of conventional psychiatry antithetical to the recovery movement? What is the role of expertise in psychiatric practice? Do challenges to epistemic authority run the risk of compromising scientific and clinical integrity?
  • Are there ways of reforming psychiatric education and training that could serve to empower mental health service users and redress some of the shortcomings of conventional psychiatry identified by Critical Psychiatry? 

    Presentations will be strictly limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for discussion. Abstracts will be peer reviewed blindly, so the author’s identifying information should be attached separately. We especially encourage submissions by service users. Detailed abstracts should be 600-1000 words and sent via email by November 15, 2016 to Christian Perring (cperring@yahoo.com), Douglas Porter (douglasporter@cox.net), and Scott Waterman (scott.waterman@uvm.edu). Notices of acceptance or rejection will be distributed in January.

CfP: Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures (Glasgow, April 2017)

Call for Papers

Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures
University of Glasgow
Mon 3 Apr 2017 – Tue 4 April 2017

The Wellcome Trust-funded Conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. The Conference Committee invites abstracts of up to 300 words for 20-minute presentations, to be submitted by no later than 31 August 2016.

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’
Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’

University of Glasgow Organizing Committee:

Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature
Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics
Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences
Dr Ross White, Mental Health and Wellbeing

Papers should address one or more of the conference’s four themes: 

1. Ancient approaches to psychotherapy
This theme seeks to explore ancient and medieval approaches to psychotherapy from the Egyptian and Babylonian world, the Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Chinese and medieval Islamic and Jewish traditions. It aims to foreground various ancient practices used in ‘the cure of the soul’, investigating the extent to which modern psychiatric techniques draw upon such wisdom traditions. Other key goals will be to distinguish diverse conceptions of selfhood required or advanced in psychotherapeutic settings, and to consider the borders between religion, medicine, and philosophy.

2. Geographies of Psychotherapy
We invite papers that wish to examine the development of psychological ideas and practices and their transformative effect over a range of (global) spaces, sites and places. Although not limited to such themes, we encourage critical debates into the uneven development of psychological practices over time and space, the changing spatialities of caring practices, embodied practices of healing, and writing psychotherapeutic geographies.

3. Postcolonial/Indigenous Psychotherapies
The emergence of different, competing schools of Western psychotherapy has been accompanied by rapid development in the capacity to share knowledge globally. Western psychotherapies are juxtaposed with forms of healing based on markedly different epistemic and philosophical underpinnings. This theme considers whether indigenous forms of healing in LMICs can be viewed as de facto psychotherapies. Attention will focus on the dynamics of power in post-colonial contexts and how this has influenced the perceived credibility of western vs indigenous forms of therapeutic/healing interaction.

4. Subcultural Psychotherapies
We invite critical engagement with the propensity to see subcultural participation (bodybuilding, gaming, body modification, BDSM, Goth, Emo, etc.) as cause or predictor of psychopathology. While remaining open to subcultural pathogenesis, we encourage exploration of subculture’s therapeutic/salutogenic dimensions, including the recovery/survivor movement, popular/mass culture, new religious movements, and anomalous experiences such as mediumship and therianthropy.

Abstract submission
Abstracts (.doc, .docx, .rtf) should be emailed to arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk by no later than 31 August 2016along with a short biography (100 words or less). Abstracts will be considered by the conference organizing committee, and notifications will be communicated by no later than 30 September 2016.

Journal Issue
There will be an opportunity for a selection of papers presented at the conference to be developed into a thematic issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Transcultural Psychiatry (http://tps.sagepub.com/) that will be entitled ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’.

Downloadable call
A .pdf of this call may be downloaded: OtherpsychsCFP

For more information: http://otherpsychs.academicblogs.co.uk

CFP – Matters of the Mind: The Materialities of Mental Ill-Health and Distress

CFP: Matters of the Mind: The Materialities of Mental Ill-Health and Distress

Edited by Anna Lavis, University of Birmingham and Karin Eli, University of Oxford

From medications to diagnostic manuals, somatic sensations to brain images, the landscape of mental health and illness is replete with diverse materialities. Against the background of a wider ‘material turn’ across the social sciences and humanities, this edited collection will offer the first text on mental ill-health and distress from a materialities perspective. Cross-disciplinary explorations of personhood and subjectivity have engendered nuanced understandings of lived experiences of mental ill-health and distress. Explorations of these as socio-culturally patterned have been accompanied by an attention to social marginalisation and structural inequalities. This has highlighted the dynamics of stigma and the structural contexts of mental ill-health and suffering. Scholars across the social sciences and humanities have also undertaken theoretical and applied evaluations of diagnostic and treatment processes, and the reach of their global flows. Yet, although these existing cross-disciplinary strands of thought have all acknowledged the roles of material environments, discourses, and substances, to date none has drawn the myriad clinical, symbolic, and mundane (im)materialities of mental health, illness, and distress to the fore of analysis.

The editors of this volume are interested in soliciting chapters that explore how an attention to materialities offers a novel critical lens onto otherwise obscured aspects of mental ill-health and distress, ranging in focus from the intimate and individual, to the cultural and societal.

With a particular emphasis on engaging with lived experiences, we welcome contributions from scholars within anthropology and sociology; medical humanities; critical and cultural theory; critical psychiatry, psychology and public health; history; literary studies; architecture and design; science and technology studies; and geography. Relevant topics may include, but are not restricted to, the following:

· Object(ive)s of psychiatry: the materialities of diagnosis and treatment.

· Global flows of psychiatry’s objects: texts, pharmaceuticals, diagnostic and treatment devices.

· The materia medica of healing and (self-)care, both clinical and mundane.

· Somatic and experiential (im)materialities: voice hearing and visions.

· Bodies and minds: corporeal materialities and embodied subjectivities of distress.

· Materialities of neuroscience and the ‘new genetics.’

· Spaces and places of suffering and care: clinics, homes, neighbourhoods.

Interested authors are invited to submit an abstract of approximately 250 words, accompanied by a bio of 100 words, to Anna Lavis (a.c.lavis@bham.ac.uk) by May 22nd. If accepted, submissions of no more than 8,000 words each (including abstract, notes, and references) must be submitted by December 2016.

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