New book – “The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, his Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing” (Damion Searls)

inkblotsH-Madness readers might be interested in the newly published book The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, his Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing by Damion Searls (Penguin Random House, 2017).

The publisher’s website reads:

The captivating, untold story of Hermann Rorschach and his famous inkblot test

In 1917, working alone in a remote Swiss asylum, psychiatrist Hermann Rorschach devised an experiment to probe the human mind: a set of ten carefully designed inkblots. For years he had grappled with the theories of Freud and Jung while also absorbing the aesthetic movements of the day, from Futurism to Dadaism. A visual artist himself, Rorschach had come to believe that who we are is less a matter of what we say, as Freud thought, than what we see.

After Rorschach’s early death, his test quickly made its way to America, where it took on a life of its own. Co-opted by the military after Pearl Harbor, it was a fixture at the Nuremberg trials and in the jungles of Vietnam. It became an advertising staple, a cliché in Hollywood and journalism, and an inspiration to everyone from Andy Warhol to Jay Z. The test was also given to millions of defendants, job applicants, parents in custody battles, and people suffering from mental illness or simply trying to understand themselves better. And it is still used today.

In this first-ever biography of Rorschach, Damion Searls draws on unpublished letters and diaries and a cache of previously unknown interviews with Rorschach’s family, friends, and colleagues to tell the unlikely story of the test’s creation, its controversial reinvention, and its remarkable endurance—and what it all reveals about the power of perception. Elegant and original, The Inkblots shines a light on the twentieth century’s most visionary synthesis of art and science.

For more information, click here.

For a recent NPR interview with the author, click here.

Call for Abstracts – Alcohol, Psychiatry and Society

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International Research Symposium – St Anne’s College, Oxford, 29 – 30 June 2017

The medicalisation of alcohol use has become a prominent discourse that guides policy makers and impacts public perceptions of alcohol and drinking. This symposium intends to map the historical and cultural dimensions of these phenomena. Emphasis is on medical attitudes and theories regarding alcohol and the changing perception of alcohol consumption in the fields of psychiatry and mental healing. The intention is to explore the shift from the use of alcohol in clinical treatment, as part of dietary regimens, incentive to work and reward for desirable behaviour during earlier periods to the emergence of alcoholism as a disease category that requires medical intervention, is covered by medical insurance and considered as a threat to public health. Continue reading

Thinking in Cases – call for submissions to History of the Human Sciences

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

As part of our celebration of the work of the incomparable John Forrester, History of the Human Sciences (HHS) is hosting a review symposium around John’s final work: Thinking in Cases (Polity: 2017). The first essay in this collectionwas originally published in HHS back in 1996: (http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/095269519600900301)

As part of our efforts to showcase the work of new and emerging scholars, HHS invites expressions of interest from all early career researchers (a flexible definition) whose work bears in some way upon the work John started with ‘Thinking in Cases’. We welcome anyone who would like to contribute to such a dialogue with John’s work, and with each other.

If interested, please send a short expression of interest (max 200 words) to the email address below, outlining your strengths as candidate for inclusion in such a review symposium. Depending upon response, we anticipate final contributions of c.3,000 words.

*

Deadlines:

Expressions of Interest: Monday 13th March, 2017.

Submission of Contributions: 31st October, 2017.

Publication in HHS: 2018.

*

If you have questions, please email Chris Millard: c[dot]millard[at]Sheffield[dot]ac[dot]uk

We look forward to hearing from you,

Felicity Callard (Editor-in-Chief) & Chris Millard (Reviews Editor)

Call for chapter proposals: Literature, Trauma and the Self

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS–LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY: WRITING, TRAUMA AND THE SELF

Centuries ago, Aristotle fashioned a term that brought literature and psychology face to face: catharsis (psychological or mental purification of the feelings). From that time onwards, literature and human psyche have been correlated either by various writers, philosophers, critics, or by means of several techniques or movements. Not only was it tragedy that combined the elements of psychology with literary production, it was also novel, poetry, short story and even some psychoanalytical theories that brought psyche and literature together. There has always been a mutual partnership of the two: psychology of men and literature of men.  It was Sigmund Freud, for instance, who introduced Oedipus complex from what Sophocles held as the plot of Oedipus the King. It was Samuel Richardson who carried the earlier features of sentimental novel and the early flashes of psychological novel through his Pamela. It was Henry James who borrowed the stream of consciousness technique from psychology and introduced it to be used in literature, and then was subtly employed by James Joyce in Ulysses and by Virginia Woolf in Mrs. Dalloway. Charles Dickens, with his famous industrial novel Great Expectations, reflected the well-established norms of psychological realism. George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion was named after the mythological figure of Greek Pygmalionand the name was also adapted into the Pygmalion effect to emphasize the observable phenomena related to the psychology and performance of men. Similarly, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita became a focal work that impacted the birth of Lolita complex. Friedrich Nietzsche’subermensch (just as it is employed by Bernard Shaw in Superman)MartinEsslin’s theatre of the absurd (employed by Samuel Beckett in Waiting for Godot), Antonin Artaud’s theatre of cruelty (employed by Edward Bond in Saved) and etc. all could be tackled in terms of interrelation of human psyche and literariness.
Psychology has also some observable impacts on the writer’s writing skill. Causing extreme changes in mood, bipolar disorder is addressed by many critics to be the central origin behind creativity. Such writers and critics as John Ruskin, Virginia Woolf, Edgar Allan Poe, Alan Garner, Hams Christian Anderson and Sherman Alexei among others are known to have bipolar disorder that impacted their literary creativity. Feminist urges also produced the female creativity within some genres of literature. It was Emily Dickenson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Virginia Woolf, George Eliot, and Bronte Sisters that embraced the psychology of the power of female creativity on the way to writing. For that reason, psychology and literature live in each other’s pockets.
This proposal suggests a forum of differing ideas on the link between literature and psychology, psychology of writing, traumatic literature, the construction of the Self within literature, the psychology of characterization, psychoanalytical approaches, and the psychology of literary creativity.
The topics of interest include but not limited to the following titles:
Psychology of Literature
Literature of Psychology
Psychology and literary genres
Psychological theories and movements
Traumatic literature
Literature and psyche
Auto/biography and  psyche
Psychoanalytical approaches
The psychology of Self and Literature
The Psychology of Writing
Trauma and Writing
The Self and Writing
Psychology and  Creativity
Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before March 31, 2017, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by April 30, 2017 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by October 30, 2017, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions athttp://www.cambridgescholars.com/t/AuthorFormsGuidelines prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.
Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Cambridge Scholars Publishing. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.
Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, UK. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit http://www.cambridgescholars.com/. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2018.
Important Dates
March 31, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline
April 30, 2017: Notification of Acceptance
October 30, 2017: Full Chapter Submission
December 30, 2017: Review Results Returned
January 30, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification
February 15, 2018: Final Chapter Submission
April 15, 2018:Manuscript delivery date
Inquiries
Editor’s Name: Önder Çakırtaş
Editor’s Affiliation: PhD, Assistant Professor, Bingol University (Turkey), Department of English Language and Literature
Editor’s Contact Information
Bingöl Üniversitesi
Fen Edebiyat Fakültesi
Oda No:D2-8 12000 Bingöl/TÜRKİYE
callforliteraturepapers@gmail.com
cakirtasonder@gmail.com

Call for Collaborators for h-madness

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As announced in January, h-madness is embarking on a set of major changes to the website and its management. It is our belief that it is time for the site to take on a more lively feel and for a wider and diverse circle of specialists in the field to be involved in generating content for h-madness.

This means, among other things, bringing on board scholars from all stages in their careers and from across the world. To that end, we are issuing a general Call for Collaborators. More specifically, we invite scholars conducting research, writing, and/or teaching on the subject of the history of madness and mental health who are interested in becoming involved in helping to run h-madness to submit a statement of their interest in one or more of the following positions:

1. H-Madness Advisory Board

The advisory board’s main job will be to serve as a resource for the senior editors and, similar to most academic journals, will be composed of more or less senior scholars in the field. Board member involvement will likely be only occasional, perhaps receiving no more than 4-5 emails/year.

2. Section Editors

Section editors will be involved in h-madness on a weekly – and, at times, perhaps a daily – basis, responsible for writing, editing, and posting content (this includes soliciting contributions from scholars in the field). Section editors may be at most any stage in their careers (from advanced doctoral students to senior scholars).

3. Editorial Assistants

The responsibility of editorial assistants will be to aid the senior editors and the section editors in their work. While most of their responsibilities will involve correspondence and website management, they also will be encouraged to generate content. Doctoral students – particularly those early on in their studies – interested in getting involved in h-madness should apply for these positions.

If you have an interest in joining h-madness in any of these capacities, submit a brief statement of interest (no more than 1-3 paragraphs) and a cv to <hpsychiatry [at] gmail.com> by March 6. And, of course, if you have any questions, feel free to contact us.

The Editors

New Issue – History of Psychiatry

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Today Bangour Village, one of the famous Scottish asylums of the 20th century, is completely abandoned. Photo by Mark Sutherland

The March 2017 issue of History of Psychiatry is now out. Chris Philo and Jonathan Andrews, as guest editors, have compiled a special issue entitled Histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland.

“Introduction: histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland,” by Chris Philo and Jonathan Andrews. The abstract reads:

This paper introduces a special issue on ‘Histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland’, situating the papers that follow in an outline historiography of work in this field. Using Allan Beveridge’s claims in 1993 about the relative lack of research on the history of psychiatry in Scotland, the paper reviews a range of contributions that have emerged since then, loosely distinguishing between ‘overviews’ – work addressing longer-term trends and broader periods and systems – and more detailed studies of particular ‘individuals and institutions’. There remains much still to do, but the present special issue signals what is currently being achieved, not least by a new generation of scholars in and on Scotland.

Continue reading

New Issue – Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte

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The first 2017 issue of Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte is now out and includes at least one article that may be of interest to H-Madness readers.

Claudia Moisel: Geschichte und Psychoanalyse. Zur Genese der Bindungstheorie von John Bowlby

Die Geschichte der Psychoanalyse sowie psychologisch-psychiatrische Expertendiskurse werden im angloamerikanischen Sprachraum gegenwärtig vielfältig erforscht, auch im Kontext der dezidiert interdisziplinär angelegten und rasch expandierenden „Childhood Studies“. Der Beitrag erläutert diese Zusammenhänge am Beispiel der laufenden Forschung zur Bindungstheorie des renommierten britischen Kinderpsychiaters John Bowlby. Bowlbys einflussreiche Studien über Heimkinder für die Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) etablieren in den fünfziger Jahren „Mutterentbehrung“ (Deprivation) als zentrale Analysekategorie der frühen Kindheit; sein eingängiges Erklärungsangebot zur Entstehung und Prävention psychischer Probleme entfaltete in der Familienpolitik große Wirkung. Der Beitrag verfolgt darüber hinaus das Ziel, das Verhältnis von Geschichte und den „Psychowissenschaften“ in zweifacher Hinsicht methodisch auszuloten, nämlich zum einen den Konstruktionscharakter psychologischer, psychiatrischer und psychoanalytischer Konzepte sichtbar zu machen, zum anderen Aufmerksamkeit zu generieren für eine Fülle zeithistorischer relevanter Quellen und Literatur, die in diesen Zusammenhängen entstanden ist, aber in der Forschung zu wenig Berücksichtigung findet.

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