Posts Tagged ‘ Freud Museum ’

Freud in Cambridge Conference (London, 1 July 2017)

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Freud in Cambridge
Hidden Histories of Psychoanalysis

Day Conference
Saturday 1 July 2017  9.30am – 5.00pm

What kind of project is psychoanalysis? In this conference speakers from a variety of disciplines investigate surprising hidden histories of psychoanalysis and their relevance for today.

SPEAKERS
Lisa Appignanesi (Writer, researcher and broadcaster)
Laura Cameron (Co-author Freud in Cambridge)
Felicity Callard (Professor in Social Science for Medical Humanities, Durham University)
Matt Ffytche (Director of the Centre for Psychoanalysis, Essex University)
Daniel Pick (Psychoanalyst and Professor of History, Birkbeck College, London)
Bob Hinshelwood (Psychoanalyst, Psychiatrist and author)
Philip Kuhn (Poet and independent researcher)
Brett Kahr (Psychotherapist, author and broadcaster)

Further information   /  Online Booking

N.B. The code to access the special rate tickets is BURSARY1 but please use an academic email.

Exhibition and symposium – Freud/Tiffany and ‘The Best Possible School'(Freud Museum, London)

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The upcoming exhibition and symposium ‘The Best Possible School’: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham and the Hietzing School in 1920s Vienna could be of interest to H-madness readers. Both will be held at the Freud Museum in London. The exhibition can be visited from the 10th of May 2017 until the 16th of July 2017. The Symposium will be held on the 13th of May 2017 with an opening reception on the 12th. The abstract of the exhibition and the symposium you can find below.

Exhibition: ‘The Best Possible School’: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham and the Hietzing School in 1920s Vienna.

Modernism, creativity, the freedom to grow as a “free and self-reliant human being” – with these beliefs, Anna Freud, the youngest daughter of Sigmund Freud, and Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham, the youngest daughter of the great American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany, founded Vienna’s Hietzing School.

To Erik H. Erikson who taught there, it was “the best possible school” and today its true significance, as both the teachers and the students remember it, comes to life in a dynamic new exhibit at the Freud Museum London.

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Thinking in Cases: On and Beyond the Couch (London Freud Museum, 30 October 2016)

 

 

John Forrester tragically died in November 2015. His long-standing research project, ‘thinking in cases’ was an attempt to theorise the particular kind of thinking that pertains to psychoanalysis and psychotherapy; different from ‘scientific’ and deductive reasoning but, he asserted, a valid form of knowledge all the same. Can one move from a textured particularity, like that in Freud’s famous cases, to a level of reliable generality? In his last book, to be published in October, Forrester teases out the meanings of the psychoanalytic case, how to characterise it and account for it as a particular kind of thinking and writing. While he was principally concerned with analysing the style of reasoning that was dominant in psychoanalysis and related disciplines, Forrester’s path-breaking account of thinking in cases will be of great interest to scholars, students and professionals across a wide range of disciplines, from history, law and the social sciences to medicine, clinical practice and the talking therapies. This conference brings together speakers from a range of disciplines to debate the pros and cons of ‘thinking in cases’.

SPEAKERS

ANDREAS MAYER (Centre Alexandre Koyré, Paris)

MATT FFYTCHE (Essex University)

BARBARA TAYLOR (Queen Mary’s)

STEPHEN FROSH (Birkbeck College)

STAN RUSZCZYNSKI (Portman Clinic)

RALUCA SOREANU (Wellcome Trust)

LISA APPIGNANESI (Chair)

30 October 2016
2pm – 5.30pm

For more information, click here.

Psychosis and Psychoanalysis Conference (Freud Museum London, 20 March 2016)

History – Politics – Theory – Technique

20 March 2016
9.30am – 5.00pm

Organised in collaboration with the Psychosis Therapy Project, a therapy service for people experiencing psychosis, as a joint fundraiser.

In partnership with South Hampstead High School.

The relation between psychosis and psychoanalysis is a paradoxical one. Psychosis is a core term in the theory of psychoanalysis, a site of clinical challenges and radical questioning. Yet it has no place in classic psychoanalytic technique.
Is there a place for psychosis in psychoanalysis? Is there a place for psychoanalysis in psychosis?

This one-day conference brings together eminent practitioners of psychoanalysis from a variety of theoretical perspectives to discuss these complex and topical questions. Drawing on their important contributions to the area of psychosis, the speakers will reflect on the political, theoretical and technical implications of their work.

PROGRAMME:

08.45 – 09.30: Registration and Coffee

09.30: HISTORY
Haya Oakley: Life in the “Anti-Psychiatry” Fast Lane
Brian Martindale: Family and Psychosis (Past & Present)
Chair: Dorothée Bonnigal-Katz

11.00: Coffee break

11.30: POLITICS
Jay Watts: Navigating Language Games around Psychosis
Barry Watt: The Politics of Kleinian Technique in Post-war UK
Chair: Anne Cooke

13.00: Lunch break

14.00: THEORY
Kate Brown: Attachment Theory and Psychosis
Stijn VanheuleConceptualising and Treating Psychosis: A Lacanian Perspective
Chair: Peter Nevins

15.45: Coffee break

16.15: TECHNIQUE
Clinical Rountable:
Dorothée Bonnigal-Katz (Presenter)
Christos Tombras and Tomasz Fortuna(Respondents)
Moderator: Gwion Jones

17.30: End

 

For more information, click here.

Announcement: Fulbright-Freud Visiting Scholar of Psychoanalysis, 2016-17

Wartezimmer_1Fulbright-Freud Visiting Scholar of Psychoanalysis, 2016-17

Deadline: August 1, 2015
Length of Grant: 4 months
Starting Date: March 1, 2017
Location: Sigmund Freud Foundation and Sigmund Freud Museum in Vienna
Benefits: This award includes a travel grant of Euro 800, medical and accident insurance, and a monthly stipend of Euro 3,300 per month for four months.
Language: The Austrian Fulbright Commission expects Fulbright-Freud scholars to have a high level of German proficiency, although English may be used as the language of instruction.
Qualifications: Open to associate and full professors. Several years of teaching/lecturing or professional experience in relevant fields of psychoanalysis.
Grant Activity: Conduct research at the Sigmund Freud Foundation in Vienna and teach between one or two courses or seminars on a topic related to the research project at a Viennese host institution. Applicants should explain why their research needs to be conducted in Vienna. Details of teaching assignment are to be arranged by the Sigmund Freud Foundation and the Austrian Fulbright Commission in consultation with grantee.
Specialization(s): human sciences, cultural studies, theory and/or practice of psychoanalysis, psychoanalytic studies, neurosciences in relation to psychoanalysis, arts related to psychoanalysis.
Comments: Applicants must solicit a letter of invitation from the Sigmund Freud Foundation by submitting a curriculum vitae and research/lecturing proposal. Grantee will have a workstation in the library of the Sigmund Freud Museum. Visit www.freud-museum.at for more information about the Freud Museum.
Contact person: Dr. Daniela Finzi, Research, Sigmund Freud Foundation, Berggasse 19, A 1090 Vienna; ph. +431 319 15 96 0; fax: +431 317 02 79; e-Mail: office@freud-museum.at.
Link to Application:
http://catalog.cies.org/

Exhibition at London’s Freud Museum: ‘Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors’

Freud Museum

10 October 2013 – 2 February 2014

Featuring work by Alice Anderson, Louise Bourgeois, Helen Chadwick, Sarah Lucas, Amie Siegel and Francis Upritchard…

Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors

What does a woman want? 
Sigmund Freud’s famous question was originally put to Princess Marie Bonaparte, patient, friend and analyst, the moving force behind Freud’s flight from Nazi Vienna to his final home in London, now the Freud Museum London.

Inspired by Lisa Appignanesi’s acclaimed book, Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors from 1800 to the Present, the exhibition highlights the experience of women and their relationship to those who confined, cared for and listened to them.  It also shows how women today conduct their own explorations of mind and imagination in challenging works of art.

How did the mind doctors of the 1900s view their female patients?  What did they make of their variously diagnosed nerves, melancholy, mania, obsession, self-mutilation, tics, possession, hysteria, desire, and rebellion and why in the early 20th century was psychoanalysis liberating for so many female authors and artists? Are some of the questions this exhibition explores.

Through intimate and revealing portraits, shown alongside original historical documents, the exhibition traces key moments in the history of ‘female maladies’ and counterpoints them with women’s boldly inventive art today.

The Women – Mary Lamb, Theroigne de Méricourt, Alice James, Anna O (Bertha Pappenheim), Dora (Ida Bauer); Augustine, Elizabeth Severn, Bryher (Winifred Annie Ellerman), HD (Hilda Doolittle), Princess Marie Bonaparte, Anna Freud, Dorothy Burlingham, Zelda Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, Marilyn Monroe, Sylvia Plath and Anna Kavan.

The Mind Doctors – Philipe Pinel, Jean Etienne Esquirol, Jean Martin Charcot, Alexander Morison, William James, Havelock Ellis, Josef Breuer, Sigmund Freud, Lou Andreas Salome, Sandor Ferenczi, Hanns Sachs, Princess Marie Bonaparte, Anna Freud, Dorothy Burlingham, Melanie Klein, Ruth Beuscher and Marianne Kris.

The Artists – Alice Anderson, Louise Bourgeois, Elliott Erwitt, Helen Chadwick, Sarah Lucas, Amie Siegel, Francis Upritchard, plus Richard Dadd and Salvador Dali.

The women’s stories are told through objects, art works, original photographs, papers, books and pictures drawn from the Freud Museum London and other international collections.  This includes Salvador Dali’s portrait of Freud, Freud’s iconic ‘modernist’ chair and the couch on which he died; original paintings and photographs of Mary Lamb, Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, London; Phillipe Pinel’s death mask on loan from the University of Edinburgh/National Galleries of Scotland; paintings by Richard Dadd and Anna Kavan and restraining garments from the Bethlem Art and History Collections Trust, London.

The Freud Museum would like to thank the Museum Dr Guislain, Ghent, Belgium, for their support in the making of the exhibition.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a season of performances, talks, films and events. Click here for further information.

Sander Gilman Lecture – Freud Museum, 3 July

Freud Museum London

3 July 2013
7pm

Sander Gilman Lecture

The German Soul and Psyche in The Third Reich

“Against the soul-destroying glorification of the instinctual life! For the nobility of the human soul! We consign to the flames the writings of the school of Sigmund Freud…

Freud’s works were ritually burned by the Nazi’s in 1933, and we have the pictures to prove it. But the relationship was more complicated than that. The Third Reich Source Book will appear this summer with the University of California Press. It is the most extensive collection of primary documents on the Third Reich ever made available to English readers. It also presents for the first time primary materials on the struggle over the meaning of the psyche and the legacy of psychoanalysis under Hitler. Sander Gilman, one of its editors, will present the reader and the material on psychology and psychoanalysis under the Nazis.

Sander L. Gilman is a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University. A cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books. His Obesity: The Biography appeared with Oxford University Press in 2010; his most recent edited volume, Wagner and Cinema (with Jeongwon Joe) was published in the same year. He is the author of the basic study of the visual stereotyping of the mentally ill, Seeing the Insane, published by John Wiley and Sons in 1982 (reprinted: 1996) as well as the standard study of Jewish Self-Hatred, the title of his Johns Hopkins University Press monograph of 1986. For twenty-five years he was a member of the humanities and medical faculties at Cornell University where he held the Goldwin Smith Professorship of Humane Studies. For six years he held the Henry R. Luce Distinguished Service Professorship of the Liberal Arts in Human Biology at the University of Chicago and for four years was a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Medicine and creator of the Humanities Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has held many distinguished posts in the UK and across the world, including the Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature at Oxford University in 2004-5, and Professor at the Institute in the Humanities, Birkbeck College from 2007 to 2012. He was elected an honorary professor of the Free University in Berlin in 2000, and has been an honorary member of the American Psychoanalytic Association since 2007.

For more information, click here.

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