Posts Tagged ‘ UCL ’

“Conversations Between Bloomsbury & Psychoanalysis: Mutual Influence or Incomprehension?” (London, 12 September)

Conversations Between Bloomsbury & Psychoanalysis:
Mutual Influence or Incomprehension?

UCL Health Humanities Centre, 12 September, 2015, 11.30am-5.30pm

In histories of modernist literature and psychoanalysis in Britain, few
topics have been as much discussed and mythologised as the relations
between Bloomsbury and Psychoanalysis. This conference reexamines the
meeting point between psychoanalysis and the Bloomsbury group, and the
tensions and contradictions that occur when such large appellations are
linked. The topic has been approached from an array of perspectives,
ranging from gender studies, discourses of modernism to literary
history. However, the first hand testimony of figures, such as James
Strachey and Virginia Woolf, is often as odds with the considered views
of subsequent critics and theorists. Literary scholars and historians
will bring to bear new research and fresh perspectives on this
intersection and discuss the possibilities of a new understanding of the
relations between Bloomsbury and Psychoanalysis. There will be
contributions from those studying Bloomsbury writers, the critics of
Bloomsbury and British psychoanalysts in the pre-World War Two period.

Speakers

Professor Sally Alexander, Goldsmiths College London – “Winnicott’s Women
Analysts.”

Professor Fuhito Endo, Seikei University Tokyo – “Joan Riviere in
Masquerade, or Her Implicitly Kleinian Criticism of Freud.”

Dee McQuillan, University College London – “Documentation versus
Interpretation: James Strachey as a Link between Psychoanalysis and
Bloomsbury.”

Professor Kunio Shin, Tsuda College Tokyo – “Some Versions of
Anti-psychoanalysis: Lewis, Richards, and Auden in the 1930s.”

Helen Tyson, Queen Mary University London – “On ‘Freudian Fiction’
–Virginia Woolf, Modernist Readers and Psychoanalysis.”

Cost: £35; Registered students (with proof): £25; UCL staff and UCL
students: free

Booking:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/conversations-between-bloomsbury-psychoanalysis-mutual-influence-or-incomprehension-tickets-17863364805

Financially supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Location: Room 103, 51 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PN

Jung History Conference at UCL (London, November 2013)

JUNG HISTORY CONFERENCE

30 November 2013, UCL

A day conference with presentations from members of the UCL Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines on ongoing research in Jung History

 

 

PROGRAMME

10.30-11.00am Registration

11-11.15am Introduction

11.15-12.00am Sonu Shamdasani “English Modernist Writers as Readers of Jung”

12.00-12.15pm Tea

12.15-1.00pm Gaia Domenici, “Books ‘For All and None’: Zarathustra, The Red Book and ‘Visionary’ Works”

1.00-2.30pm Lunch

2.30-3.15pm Christopher Wagner, “Jung’s Alchemy: The Concept and Uses of the Quaternity.”

3.15-4.00pm Vicente de Moura, “The case of Maggy Reichstein – Jung’s Quest and Eastern Psychology.”

4.00-4.30pm Tea

4.30-5.15pm Matei Iagher, “The Sun and the Blue Sky: C.G. Jung and Mircea Eliade on Religion.”

5.15-6.00pm Martin Liebscher, “With Queen Vaidehi to the Pure Land: Jung’s Reading of the Amitāyur-dhyāna-sūtra.”

Cost: £45
Registered Student (bring proof of ID): £30
UCL staff/student: free

Location: Arts and Humanities Common Room (G24), Foster Court, Malet Place, University College London

Click here to register.

For further information, contact Sonu Shamdasani at s.shamdasani@ucl.ac.uk

Conference: Psychotherapeutics from the York Retreat to the Present Day (London, October 2013)

Conference: Psychotherapeutics from the York Retreat to the Present Day

UCL Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines

Friday, 11 October 2013 at 11:00 – Sunday, 13 October 2013 at 18:00 (BST)

London, United Kingdom

A 3-day international conference bringing together historians, clinical practitioners and anthropologists to present original research and discuss the development of psychotherapies since the 18th century.

DRAFT CONFERENCE PROGRAMME – subject to change

 Friday 11th October

 

10.30 Registration opens, Old Refectory, UCL Main Building

11.00-11.30

Welcome address

11.30-12.30

18th and 19th Centuries

 

Edward Brown (Independent scholar)

François Leuret:  Nineteenth Century Psychotherapist

Sharlene Walbaum (Quinnipian University, Connecticut)

Moral Therapies Before the York Retreat: Work and Therapeutics in 18th C English and Scottish Asylums’

Andrea Korenjak (Paris-Lodron-University, Salzburg)

Music and “Moral Treatment”: Music as Therapeutic Medium in the 19th Century as Reflected in Present-Day Music Therapy Concepts

Lunch 12.30-14.00

14.00-15.00

Late 19th Century

 

Sarah Chaney (University College London)

The Action of the Imagination: Daniel Hack Tuke and Late Victorian Psychotherapeutics

 

Thibaud Trochu (University of Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Lourdes’s ‘miraculous’ healings as viewed by a protestant scientist

 

C. Bartolucci and G.P Lombardo (University of Rome Sapienza)

The renewal in the diagnosis and treatment of the abnormal subjects according to Enrico Morselli(1852-1929)

15.00-15.30 coffee break

15.30-16.30

Early-Mid 20th Century

 

Monika Ankele (University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf)

Occupational Therapy in Germany during the Weimar Period (1918-1933)

David Freis (European University Institute, Florence)

Subordination, Authority, Psychotherapy: Mental Hygiene and Politics in Interwar Vienna

Simon Taylor (Columbia University New York)

Between Philosophy and Psychotherapeutics: Existential Analysis and the Birth of Anxiety

16.30-17.10

Psychiatry in the ‘60s and ‘70s

Peter Agulnik, Craig Fees, David Kennard, David Millard, & John Hall (British Psychological Society)

Harnessing personal experience in understanding the development of therapeutic communities and environments: an Oxford case history

Kateřina Lišková (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic)

Everything for the Couple: Sex Therapy in Czechoslovakia during Normalization

Saturday 12th October

11.00-12.00

Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis

 

Susan Lamb (McGill University)

Importing, Appropriating, and Condemning Psychoanalysis:Adolf Meyer’s Use of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalytic Technique at Johns Hopkins, 1913-1917

Arthur Eaton (University College London)

Undercurrents: the history of lay psycho-analysis in the USA

Dee McQuillan (University College London)

Bringing Psychoanalysis to Bloomsbury: Strachey and the Translation of Freud into English.

12.00-13.30 lunch

13.30-14.30

Art Therapies

Susan Hogan

History of Art Therapy

Imogen Wiltshire (University of Birmingham)

On the Historical Origins of British Art Therapy: Arthur Segal, Painting and German Modernism

Cristina Hanganu-Bresch (University of the Sciences, Philadelphia)

The Proof is in the Brush-Stroke: Diagnosing and Treating Psychiatric Patients through Art

14.30-15.30 coffee break

15.30-16.30

Transcultural Contexts

 Nancy Rose Hunt (University of Michigan)

Neurasthenia and Vernacular Therapies the Colonial Situation of the Congo

 

Yu-Chuan Wu (Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Psychotherapy at Home: Morita Therapy for Neurotic Disposition in Japan, 1919-1945

Roland Littlewood (University College London)

Anthropological Approaches and Transcultural Psychiatry

 

Sunday 13th October

 

11.00-12.00

New Paradigms in Modern Psychotherapy

 

Sonu Shamdasani (University College London)

Notes on Wellbeing in 20th Century Psychotherapy

 

Felicity Callard (University of Durham)

Behavioural Therapy and the Calibration of Anxiety

Rachel Rosner (Independent Scholar)

To Manualize Psychotherapy: Aaron T. Beck and the Creation of the Manualized Treatment Protocol

12.00.-13.30

13.30-14.30

Hallucinogens and Psychotherapy

 

Matei Iagher (University College London)

Ronald Sandison and the Use of LSD in Psychotherapy

Jelena Martinovic (University of Lausanne)

Bootstrappers Seeking to Understand Creativity: Experimental Science, Psychiatry and Cybernetics (1960-1970)

 

Sarah Marks

Stanislav Grof and LSD Psychotherapy

14.30-15.00 coffee break

15.00-16.00

Concepts and Debates in Modern Psychotherapy

 

Stephanie Pache (University of Lausanne)

FeministTherapy:HowFeminismShapesPsychotherapy

Ulrich Koch (Johns Hopkins University)

Cruel to be kind? The politics of professionalism and the controversies over therapists’ displays of emotions in the consulting room (ca. 1940-1980)

Andreas Sommer (University of Cambridge)

Discarnate Spirits as Pathogens and Cure in Modern Western Psychiatry

For tickets, click here.

British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

Friday 17th May

Dr. Fabio De Sio (Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf) and Dr. Chantal Marazia (Europa-Universität Viadrina)

“The Psychic Hans Effect. Experimental Animal psi from Karl Krall to the present.”

This paper explores the issue of animal psi experimentation in the twentieth century (ca. 1920s-1970s). The passage from what has been called the “anecdotal phase” of animal psychology to the experimental phase had a rather precise parallel in psi research. From sources of marvel and anecdotal evidence of paranormal phenomena, in the course of the twentieth century animals progressively became elements of a specific experimental setting. More specifically, rigorous animal experimentation was seen as a way of overcoming a number of problems and strictures deriving from the very nature of psi experiences.

Animals were seen as a source of “genuine” instances of psychic phenomena, unaltered by human culture and communication, as well as standardizable research material, allowing to overcome the scarcity and ephemerality of human cases. Nevertheless, the need to develop animal-specific paradigms raised as many problems as it was supposed to resolve. Making the animal (either in the wild or in the lab) the centre of experimental psychic research entailed the definition of a number of issues that were common to psychic research, animal psychology, physiology and zoology: the issue of animal subjectivity and individuality; that of the evolutionary stand of psychic powers (at what level of the evolutionary ladder were they supposed to belong, their correlation with the evolution of the nervous system, etc.); finally, that of the human-animal relation in the experimental setting (whether the process of bonding between animals and humans was to be considered part of the procedure or a source of confusion). By considering different examples of psi research on animals (both observational and experimental), we explore the ambiguous roles and meanings given to animals in experimental research.

Sponsored by the British Psychological Society. Open to the public.

Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

Time: 6pm to 7.30 pm.

Location:

UCL Institute of the Americas, Room 105
51 Gordon Square
London WC1H

CFP: From Moral Treatment to Psychological Therapies (UCL)

CFP: From Moral Treatment to Psychological Therapies: Histories of Psychotherapeutics from the York Retreat to the Present Day.

Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines, UCL
11-13th October 2013

Whilst the history of psychiatry has become a well developed field of scholarship, there remain few examinations of psychotherapeutic treatments beyond histories of psychoanalytic approaches. This conference will bring together recent historical research on therapeutic treatments for mental distress and disorder, from the 18th century up to the present. It seeks to explore how such therapies were developed, their institutional and intellectual contexts, and the debates and controversies which may surround their use. ‘Psychotherapeutics’ is defined in its broadest terms, and is intended to include approaches that have been accepted by the medical or state establishments, as well as those practiced outside official institutional settings. Such modes of therapy could include moral treatment, mesmerism, mental healing, ‘talking’ therapies with a wide variety of theoretical bases, from psychoanalysis to cognitive therapy, as well as professional interventions such as those from psychiatric nursing, mental health social work, occupational therapy, play therapy and art therapy.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• The philosophical basis of therapies, such as existential, gestalt or behavioural approaches etc.
• Connections between the generation of therapeutic methods and their orginators’ biographies.
• Institutional, economic and political influences on the development of therapeutic practice.
• Psychotherapeutics in the health services.
• The professionalization and regulation of psychotherapeutic practice.
• The relationship between psychotherapeutic methods and other fields of knowledge, e.g. pedagogy, criminology, the neurosciences etc.
• Debates and controversies about psychotherapeutic approaches.
• The development of specific approaches for different age groups.
• Psychotherapeutic concepts in popular culture and the media.

Abstracts of up to 500 words for 20 minute papers should be sent to Sarah Marks at sarah.marks@ucl.ac.uk. Proposals for themed panels with a maximum of four participants are also welcome. The deadline for individual papers and panel proposals is the 10th June 2013. Participants will be notified whether their papers have been accepted by 20th June 2013.

British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

Sponsored by the British Psychological Society. Open to the public.

Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

Tuesday 22nd January

Professor Saulo de Freitas Araujo (Universidade de Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil)

The Role of Philosophy in Wundtian Psychology: Towards a New Interpretation of Wundt’s Psychological Project

Despite the numerous and important contributions brought by Wundt scholarship in recent decades, some aspects of his work remain unclear and poorly understood. The aim of this talk is to explore one of these aspects, namely, the relationship between philosophy and psychology in Wundt’s thought. To this end, we shall discuss an important yet neglected moment in Wundtian psychology, which remains unexplained to date: why did Wundt abandon his early theory of the unconscious? According to the interpretation offered here, this can only be adequately explained by his intense philosophical studies in the period preceding the publication of the Grundzüge in 1874, especially in relation to Kant. Finally, we will point out some implications of this analysis to the general interpretation of Wundt’s psychological project.

Time: 6pm to 7.30pm

Location: UCL Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, Room 544,* 5th Floor, 1‑19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 7HB

Directions: From the main reception, go through the double doors at the back and turn left, walk the length of this corridor and at the very end turn left again ‑ you will find yourself in front of the ‘West’ Lifts. Take these to 5th Floor. On exiting the lift, turn right through double doors and then left through single door, walk the length of this corridor pass through another door and then turn right ‑ you will see a marble table ahead. Room 544 is straight ahead.

British Psychological Society History of Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

British Psychological Society History of Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

Sponsored by the British Psychological Society. Open to the public.

Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

Wednesday 21st November

Dr. Maria Teresa Brancaccio (Maastricht University) – “War Trauma in France and Italy (1920s-1980s)”

Time: 6pm to 7.30pm

In the twentieth century, medical-psychological theories on the health effects of war-related suffering as well as their social recognition presented large variations in different European countries. Focusing on the medical debates and on the diagnostic categories adopted in France and in Italy in the aftermaths of the two World Wars, the paper will investigate how changes in medical, social, and political thinking influenced the understanding of war trauma in the two countries.

Location: UCL Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, Room 544,* 5th Floor, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 7HB Directions: From the main reception, go through the double doors at the back and turn left, walk the length of this corridor and at the very end turn left again – you will find yourself in front of the ‘West’ Lifts. Take these to 5th Floor. On exiting the lift, turn right through double doors and then left through single door, walk the length of this corridor pass through another door and then turn right – you will see a marble table ahead. Room 544 is straight ahead.

For more information, click here.

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