Posts Tagged ‘ Wellcome Trust ’

Bedlam: the asylum and beyond (Wellcome Trust exhibition) September 2016 – January 2017

Bedlam: the asylum and beyond

EXHIBITION

15 September 2016 – 15 January 2017

Follow the rise and fall of the mental asylum and explore how it has shaped the complex landscape of mental health today. Reimagine the institution, informed by the experiences of the patients, doctors, artists and reformers who inhabited the asylum or created alternatives to it.

Today asylums have largely been consigned to history but mental illness is more prevalent than ever, as our culture teems with therapeutic possibilities: from prescription medications and clinical treatment to complementary medicines, online support, and spiritual and creative practices. Against this background, the exhibition interrogates the original ideal that the asylum represented – a place of refuge, sanctuary and care – and asks whether and how it could be reclaimed.

Taking Bethlem Royal Hospital as a starting point, ‘Bedlam: the asylum and beyond’ juxtaposes historical material and medical records with individual testimonies and works by artists such as David Beales, Richard Dadd, Dora García, Eva Kotátková, Madlove: A Designer Asylum, Shana Moulton, Erica Scourti, Javier Téllez and Adolf Wölfli, whose works reflect or reimagine the institution, as both a physical and a virtual space.

This Way Madness Lies: The Asylum and Beyond’, a highly illustrated book produced to accompany the exhibition, will be available from the Wellcome Shop and online.

For more information, click here.

Exhibition – States of Mind: Tracing the edges of consciousness

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States of Mind: Tracing the edges of consciousness

EXHIBITION

4 February 2016 – 16 October 2016

Following on from ‘States of Mind: Ann Veronica Janssens‘, this changing exhibition will examine perspectives from artists, psychologists, philosophers and neuroscientists to interrogate our understanding of the conscious experience.

Exploring phenomena such as somnambulism, synaesthesia, and disorders of memory and consciousness, the exhibition will examine ideas around the nature of consciousness, and in particular what can happen when our typical conscious experience is interrupted, damaged or undermined.

‘States of Mind: Tracing the edges of consciousness’ will feature a series of changing installations. The first one will be ‘The Whisper Heard’ by Imogen Stidworthy, from 4 February until 24 April. Find out more about this and future installations.

The exhibition will also feature work by artists Carla MacKinnon, Louise K Wilson, A. R. Hopwood, Mary Kelly and Aya Ben Ron.

For more information, see http://wellcomecollection.org/exhibitions/states-mind-tracing-edges-consciousness

Wonder: Art and Science on the Brain (London, Spring 2013)

The understanding of human thought, emotion, behaviour and expression are common to both neuroscience – the study of the brain and the nervous system – and to many artists working across visual arts, music, theatre, performance and film. Wonder brings together the Wellcome Trust and the Barbican for the first time – two cutting-edge organisations from both fields creating a rich season of events that explores and is inspired by where art and neuroscience collide.

Highlights include a music inspired performance lecture by Marcus du Sautoy; Ruby Wax giving a personal insight into her journey from the heights of fame to depression; a film season exploring mental health on the big screen; Salon a Parisian theatrical 19th century styled event that allows you to debate the big topics of 21st century; a science and art inspired Barbican Weekender – and a feast of other events that invite you to think, to explore and to wonder.

For more information, click here.

The Brain and the Mind – King’s College London

How much of who we are is mind, and how much is brain?

The Centre for the Humanities and Health at King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust are putting together a series of debates between neuroscientists, artists, philosophers and analysts. Organized by Lisa Appignanesi and Lara Feigel, this series contains a number of events including the following talks, open to all:

– “The Brain, Free Will and the Inner Life” (18 October 2012)

– “Darwin, Biology and the Brain’s Order and Disorders” (22 November 2012)

– “The Workings of Empathy” (4 December 2012)

– “Autism and the Concept of Psychological Normality” (31 January 2013)

– “The Gendered Brain” (26 February 2013)

– “You Must Remember This” (28 March 2013)

Speakers include Lisa Appignanesi, Simon Baron-Cohen, A. S. Byatt, Imogen Cooper, Tim Crane, Anthony David, David Papineau, and others.

For more information and booking details, click here.

Seminar Series – History of Psychiatry and Psychology

UCL
The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine in collaboration with the Centre for the History of Psychology of the British Psychological Society have put together part of the Spring program for their joint seminar series on the History of Psychiatry and Psychology:

23 February 2011

Dr. Suzanne Gieser, “The Pioneers of Psychotherapy in Sweden”

2 March 2011

Professor Michael Hagner, “What is Dippoldism? Sex, Crime and Education in Germany Circa 1900”

The seminars take place at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 5th Floor Lecture Room, The Wellcome Building, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE on Wednesdays, 5.30pm-7.00pm preceded by refreshments at 5.15pm.

Additional information can be found at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/histmed/events/events

Damaging the Body Seminar Series

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The Wellcome Trust for the History of Medicine at UCL in conjunction with the University of the West of England

This seminar series will build on material presented at the September 2010 Damaging the Body workshop, generating a new historiographical field pertaining to physical damage to the body in Victorian and twentieth century psychiatry. Whether as treatment or symptom of illness, the problematic discourse of the Victorian body extended well beyond the asylum, incorporating elements as diverse as the functional “self-mutilation” of hysteria (as Roy Porter has termed it), the physical effects of alcohol, opiates or syphilis and the relationship between tattooing and criminality. Moreover, in the later decades of the century, suicide, insanity and crime became strongly connected, throughout Europe and North America, to discourses on the physical and mental degeneration of the race. This complicated and often contradictory dialogue has not been simplified subsequently; the late twentieth century in particular has seen so-called “epidemics” of suicide, self-harm, binge-drinking and anorexia nervosa, repeatedly represented by the media as the all-but inescapable perils of modern society. Discourses on the damaged body thus continue to strongly influence our perceptions of ourselves, our ideas of gender, and of the relationship between the body and the mind. Through a variety of disciplines, including history, sociology, history of art, gender studies and literature, this seminar series will explore discrete elements of bodily damage in the last century and a half, opening up wider historical, sociological and psychological concerns.

Speakers will speak for 40 – 50 minutes on a topic, followed by a similar period for questions.

Monday 17th January
An Vleugels
Hurting Bodies and Mind: Alcohol in Belgium 1848-1914

Tuesday 8th February
Chris Millard
Attempted Suicide and British Psychiatric Research: Registers of Space and Knowledge Production

Monday 21st February
Ivan Crozier
Culture-Bound Syndromes, Koro and the Emergence of ‘Cosmopolitan’ Psychiatry

Monday 14th March
David Haslam
Imperfect Bodies?: Clinical and Sociological Perspectives on Obesity

Monday 9th May
Gemma Angel
Title tbc.

Tuesday 31st May
Sander Gilman
Title tbc.

Registration for this event is not required.

Admission from 5.45pm – 6.15pm

More information can be found at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/histmed/library/Damaging_Termtwo2010

Seminar series – History of Psychiatry and Psychology

The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine in collaboration with the Centre for the History of Psychology of the British Psychological Society have put together this term’s program for their joint seminar series on the History of Psychiatry and Psychology:

10 November 2010
Dr Ernst Falzeder (University of Innsbruck), Freud in America, Freud on America, Freud and America

17 November 2010
Dr James Kennaway (University of Durham), The Piano Plague: The Nineetenth-Century Psychiatric Critique of Female Musical Education

1 December 2010
Alexandra Bacopoulos-Viau (University of Cambridge), Automatism, Psychology, Modernism: The Case of Pierre Janet

8 December 2010
Professor Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen (University of Washington), Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression

The seminars take place at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 5th Floor Lecture Room, The Wellcome Building, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE on Wednesdays, 5.30pm-7.00pm preceded by refreshments at 5.15pm.

Additional information can be found here.

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