Posts Tagged ‘ Lisa Appignanesi ’

BBC 3 “Madness in Civilisation, Night Walking” program with Lisa Appignanesi, Andrew Scull

In this new BBC Radio 3 programme, Matthew Sweet talks to Andrew Scull, author of Madness in Civilisation, about how different cultures around the world and through time have dealt with what we might call madness, insanity or the loss of reason and how the experience, felt or observed, has been interpreted by writers and artists. They are joined by Lisa Appignanesi, author of Trials of Passion and Mad, Bad and Sad to discuss whether the west’s long-term belief that madness had its roots in the body was bad news for women.

Matthew Beaumont also presents his history of an ancient crime but one still on the statute books of Massachussetts – Night Walking. Via the pens of Samuel Johnson who blamed London’s noxious night hours on arrogant aristocrats, to William Blake’s evocations of London’s Darkness, Free Thinking hears from those who had nothing in common with their slumbering fellows and who like Charles Dickens, enjoyed a time that brought some sense of better things, else forgotten and unattainable. Alongside, Deborah Longworth with a view of the flaneuse, the female solitary ambler and a pen-portrait of Dorothy Richardson whose relationship with the city of London outweighed all other passions in her life.

To access the programme, click here.

New book – “Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness” (Lisa Appignanesi)

This book journeys into the heart of dark passions and the crimes they impel. When passion is in the picture, what is criminal, what sane, what mad or simply bad? Brighton, 1870: A well-respected spinster infuses chocolate creams with strychnine in order to murder her lover’s wife. Paris, 1880: A popular performer stalks her betraying lover through the streets of the city for weeks and finally takes aim. New York, 1906: A millionaire shoots dead a prominent architect in full view of a theatre audience. Through court and asylum records, letters and newspaper accounts, this book brings to life a period when the psychiatric professions were consolidating their hold on our understanding of what is human. An increasingly popular press allowed the public unprecedented insight into accounts of transgressive sexuality, savage jealousy and forbidden desires. With great story-telling flair, Lisa Appignanesi teases out the vagaries of passion and the clashes between the law and the clinic as they stumble towards a (sometimes reviled) collaboration. Sexual etiquette and class roles, attitudes to love, madness and gender, notions of respectability and honour, insanity and lunacy, all are at play in that vital forum in which public opinion is shaped – the theatre of the courtroom.

Lisa Appignanesi is a prize-winning writer, novelist, broadcaster and cultural commentator.  A Visiting Professor at King’s College London, she is former President of the campaigning writers association, English PEN, and Chair of London’s Freud Museum.  She will be taking part in the Swindon Literature Festival next month. For more information, see the festival website.

For a recent review of Trials of Passion in The Telegraph, click here.

 

New Release: Paris Requiem, by Lisa Appignanesi

Arcadia Books has now published a new edition of Lisa Appignanesi’s novel Paris Requiem:


Paris,1899. Capital of the crime passionnel. The city is electric with excitement…

Preparations for the universal exhibition and the dawn of a new century have hit fever pitch. But the sensual spectacle of the belle époque is overshadowed by racial and social tensions, as the Dreyfus affair unleashes a riotous surge of anti-semitism into its midst enters James Norton, an American charged with bringing home his brother Raf and their high-spirited sister Ellie. When the body of the beautiful Jewish woman Raf loves turns up in the Seine, and her sister is discovered in the sprawling Salpétrière asylum, the siblings are drawn into a dark web of violence, madness and death. As James reluctantly tackles his mission, it emerges that he and Paris share a history – one that is not altogether unlinked to the turbulent present that now confronts him.

Click here for a recent review of Paris Requiem in The Independent.

Appignanesi is also the author of several non-fiction books such as the acclaimed Mad, Bad and Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors, which inspired the new exhibition taking place at the Freud Museum this season.

Exhibition at London’s Freud Museum: ‘Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors’

Freud Museum

10 October 2013 – 2 February 2014

Featuring work by Alice Anderson, Louise Bourgeois, Helen Chadwick, Sarah Lucas, Amie Siegel and Francis Upritchard…

Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors

What does a woman want? 
Sigmund Freud’s famous question was originally put to Princess Marie Bonaparte, patient, friend and analyst, the moving force behind Freud’s flight from Nazi Vienna to his final home in London, now the Freud Museum London.

Inspired by Lisa Appignanesi’s acclaimed book, Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors from 1800 to the Present, the exhibition highlights the experience of women and their relationship to those who confined, cared for and listened to them.  It also shows how women today conduct their own explorations of mind and imagination in challenging works of art.

How did the mind doctors of the 1900s view their female patients?  What did they make of their variously diagnosed nerves, melancholy, mania, obsession, self-mutilation, tics, possession, hysteria, desire, and rebellion and why in the early 20th century was psychoanalysis liberating for so many female authors and artists? Are some of the questions this exhibition explores.

Through intimate and revealing portraits, shown alongside original historical documents, the exhibition traces key moments in the history of ‘female maladies’ and counterpoints them with women’s boldly inventive art today.

The Women – Mary Lamb, Theroigne de Méricourt, Alice James, Anna O (Bertha Pappenheim), Dora (Ida Bauer); Augustine, Elizabeth Severn, Bryher (Winifred Annie Ellerman), HD (Hilda Doolittle), Princess Marie Bonaparte, Anna Freud, Dorothy Burlingham, Zelda Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, Marilyn Monroe, Sylvia Plath and Anna Kavan.

The Mind Doctors – Philipe Pinel, Jean Etienne Esquirol, Jean Martin Charcot, Alexander Morison, William James, Havelock Ellis, Josef Breuer, Sigmund Freud, Lou Andreas Salome, Sandor Ferenczi, Hanns Sachs, Princess Marie Bonaparte, Anna Freud, Dorothy Burlingham, Melanie Klein, Ruth Beuscher and Marianne Kris.

The Artists – Alice Anderson, Louise Bourgeois, Elliott Erwitt, Helen Chadwick, Sarah Lucas, Amie Siegel, Francis Upritchard, plus Richard Dadd and Salvador Dali.

The women’s stories are told through objects, art works, original photographs, papers, books and pictures drawn from the Freud Museum London and other international collections.  This includes Salvador Dali’s portrait of Freud, Freud’s iconic ‘modernist’ chair and the couch on which he died; original paintings and photographs of Mary Lamb, Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, London; Phillipe Pinel’s death mask on loan from the University of Edinburgh/National Galleries of Scotland; paintings by Richard Dadd and Anna Kavan and restraining garments from the Bethlem Art and History Collections Trust, London.

The Freud Museum would like to thank the Museum Dr Guislain, Ghent, Belgium, for their support in the making of the exhibition.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a season of performances, talks, films and events. Click here for further information.

Freud Museum Annual Lecture 2013: How Well Does Freud’s Work Stand the Test of Time? (Allen Frances, MD)

Freud Museum Annual Lecture 2013

The Freud Museum and King’s College London
present
The Freud Memorial Lecture 2013
Dr. Allen Frances:
How Well Does Freud’s Work Stand the Test of Time?

5 June 2013 7.30pm (doors open at 7.15pm)
Edmond J Safra Theatre, King’s College London, The Strand, WC2R 2LS
Allen Frances, MD, was the Chair of the Task Force that prepared the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV), often called the bible of the American psychiatric profession. However, he has been a vocal critic of the new DSM V, condemning what he calls its diagnostic hyperinflation. His new book, Saving Normal, is part mea culpa, part j‘accuse, and part cri de coeur. It explores why psychiatry has always been subject to so many fads, while deploring the medicalization of everyday human experience and the excessive use of psychiatric medicine.
In the prestigious Freud Memorial Lecture, Dr Frances argues that the current under-estimation of Freud is in part the price for his having been overestimated during his lifetime. ‘It is unwise to worship Freud or the DSM as bibles – but equally unwise not to know them,’ he says. His lecture will draw attention to which of Freud’s contributions he thinks still relevant, which quaint historical artefacts.
A graduate of the Columbia University Psychoanalytic Center, where he taught the Freud course for ten years, Allen Francie is now Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University, where previously he was Chair.
Convenor: Lisa Appignanesi, Chair of the Freud Museum and visiting Professor in Literature and the Medical Humanities, Kings College London.
The Freud Memorial Lecture is a leading event in the Freud Museum London Events Calendar. In past years it has been delivered by such luminaries as Edward Said, Slavoj Zizek, Adam Phillips and Michael Brearley.

Advance booking recommended. Tickets are free for King’s staff and students.
Contact eventsandmedia@freud.org.uk or +44 (0)20 7435 2002

The Brain and the Mind – King’s College London

How much of who we are is mind, and how much is brain?

The Centre for the Humanities and Health at King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust are putting together a series of debates between neuroscientists, artists, philosophers and analysts. Organized by Lisa Appignanesi and Lara Feigel, this series contains a number of events including the following talks, open to all:

– “The Brain, Free Will and the Inner Life” (18 October 2012)

– “Darwin, Biology and the Brain’s Order and Disorders” (22 November 2012)

– “The Workings of Empathy” (4 December 2012)

– “Autism and the Concept of Psychological Normality” (31 January 2013)

– “The Gendered Brain” (26 February 2013)

– “You Must Remember This” (28 March 2013)

Speakers include Lisa Appignanesi, Simon Baron-Cohen, A. S. Byatt, Imogen Cooper, Tim Crane, Anthony David, David Papineau, and others.

For more information and booking details, click here.

“Writing Madness” – BBC Radio 4

Currently streaming on BBC Radio 4 is a programme entitled “Writing Madness” that explores the links between modern psychiatric thought and great works of fiction.

Contributors include psychotherapist and essayist Adam Philips, leading psychiatrist Simon Wessely, cultural historian Lisa Appignanesi and Chris Thompson, psychiatrist and medical director of The Priory.

The website offers us a taste of the programme:

How did modern literary and psychiatric ideas meet and how did each shape the other? Do these heroines show literature of the period to be a critical – and even emancipating – force…or is fiction really medicine’s stooge? Novels on the couch include Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway….interestingly with both novels there’s a tendency to base the heroines on real people – Nicole Diver is based on the case history of Fitzgerald’s own wife Zelda, whereas Woolf’s Mrs.Dalloway comes very close in literary terms to what Freud calls ‘self-analysis’ – one difference is that Woolf sometimes believed ‘madness’ was necessary to be creative, while Scott Fitzgerald depicted it as disastrous drain on creativity (ie. his). And both novels have the dynamic and lucrative new industry of psychotherapy in their sights. Vivienne compares fiction in the age of Freud to literary ideas of mental health in the Victorian age and in Dickens specifically, using Great Expectations’ Miss Havisham as a case study.

Click here to stream the 30-minute clips.

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