Posts Tagged ‘ 19th century ’

New issue – Medical History

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The new issue of Medical History includes one article that could be of interest to H-Madness readers: Angela McCarthy, Catharine Coleborne, Maree O’Connor and Elspeth Knewstubb, ‘Lives in the Asylum Record, 1864 to 1910: Utilising Large Data Collection for Histories of Psychiatry and Mental Health‘. The abstract reads:

This article examines the research implications and uses of data for a large project investigating institutional confinement in Australia and New Zealand. The cases of patients admitted between 1864 and 1910 at four separate institutions, three public and one private, provided more than 4000 patient records to a collaborative team of researchers. The utility and longevity of this data and the ways to continue to understand its significance and contents form the basis of this article’s interrogation of data collection and methodological issues surrounding the history of psychiatry and mental health. It examines the themes of ethics and access, record linkage, categories of data analysis, comparison and record keeping across colonial and imperial institutions, and constraints and opportunities in the data itself. The aim of this article is to continue an ongoing conversation among historians of mental health about the role and value of data collection for mental health and to signal the relevance of international multi-sited collaborative research in this field.

 

Conference report – Madness in Civilization: Current research into the history of psychiatry in the Low Countries

Madness II

On the second of June 2017 a symposium was held in Amsterdam about madness in civilization. The conference aim was to evaluate the history of madness in the Netherlands, not only focussing on the historiography of this field but also on new and ongoing research. A recap of the symposium can be found here.

 

 

 

New issue – Sciences sociales et santé

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A new issue of Sciences sociales et Santé has appeared and includes two articles that could be of interest to h-madness readers.

Nicolas Henckes, Entre tutelle et assistance : le débat sur la réforme de la loi de 1838 sur les aliénés des années 1870 aux années 1910.

Jean-Christophe Coffin, L’exploration de l’assistance psychiatrique française. Jalons pour une reformulation.

 

 

 

Conference – The Body Politics: States in the History of Medicine and Health. Provisional programme online

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The European Association for the History of Medicine and Health organises the conference The Body Politics: States in the History of Medicine and Health, which will be held from the 30th of August until the 2nd of september in Bucharest. The provisional conference programme has appeared online and incorporates a few sessions that could be of interest to H-Madness readers (see below). For a full overview of all the panels see here. 

Thursday, August 31st
11.00‐13.00 PANEL 1 ‐ ETHICS AND EXPERTISE. Chair: Frank Huisman (Main Amphitheatre )
  • State-authorized medical ethics: the disciplinary function of the British General Medical Council, 1858‐1914 (Andreas‐Holger Maehle)
  • ‘“A misconception of educational psychologists’ work”: expertise, child psychology and the aftermath of the 1967 Summerfield Report’ (Andrew Burchell)
  • Medical Ethics in a Modern Society. The ‘free medical profession’ and the Dutch state, 1945‐ 1980 (Noortje Jacobs)
  • State and expertise. The emergence of psychiatry as legal expertise in Europe in the 1820s (Svein Atle Skålevåg)

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Conference – Medikalisierte Kindheiten. Die neue Sorge um das Kind vom ausgehenden 19. bis ins späte 20. Jahrhundert (29/06/17-01/07/17, Innsbruck)

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The conference Medikalisierte Kindheiten. Die neue Sorge um das Kind vom ausgehenden 19. bis ins späte 20. Jahrhundert could be of interest to H-Madness readers. The conference will take place from 29.06.2017 until 01.07.2017 and will be held at Innsbruck, Institut für Erziehungswissenschaft. You can register here. The abstract and programme are as follows:

Abstract

Die jüngere Forschung im Umfeld der Auseinandersetzungen über den gewaltförmigen Umgang mit Kindern und Jugendlichen in Fürsorgeerziehungseinrichtungen der Nachkriegsjahre stellt die Sorge um das “erziehungsschwierige” Kind als ein trans-disziplinäres Projekt der Moderne heraus, in welchem differente Wissensordnungen wie die Psychiatrie und die Pädiatrie, die Pädagogik und die Psychologie, die Kriminologie und Jurisdiktion sowie die Sexual- und Bevölkerungswissenschaften das diskursiv auszuhandeln begannen, was am Kind als gesund oder krank, normal oder abweichend anzusehen sei. Voreinem medikalen Hintergrund und in wechselnder Leaderschaft prägten diese Wissenschaftszweige die Debatten über Kinderschutz und Kindergesundheit und fanden in Schulen, Heimen, Kliniken, Kinderbeobachtungsstellen oder Einrichtungen der Säuglings- und Kinderfürsorge ihre räumliche Gestalt und institutionalisierte Wirkung. Ihr regulatorisches Interesse richtete sich auf den Körper, den Geist und die Ausdrucksformen von Kindern (und Jugendlichen) in Entwicklungs- und/oder Erziehungs-schwierigkeiten. Als besonders einflussreich haben sich dabei die medizinischen Fächer Pädiatrie und Psychiatrie sowie hybride Teilfächer wie die Heil- oder Sonderpädagogik erwiesen.

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New issue – History of Psychiatry

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The second issue of 2017 of History of Psychiatry is now available and could be of interest to H-madness readers. The issue includes the following articles:

Philippe Huneman, From a religious view of madness to religious mania: the Encyclopédie, Pinel, Esquirol.

This paper focuses on the shift from a concept of insanity understood in terms of religion to another (as entertained by early psychiatry, especially in France) according to which it is believed that forms of madness tinged by religion are difficult to cure. The traditional religious view of madness, as exemplified by Pascal (inter alia), is first illustrated by entries from the Encyclopédie. Then the shift towards a medical view of madness, inspired by Vitalistic physiology, is mapped by entries taken from the same publication. Firmed up by Pinel, this shift caused the abandonment of the religious view. Esquirol considered religious mania to be a vestige from the past, but he also believed that mental conditions carrying a religious component were difficult to cure.

The debate on the causes and the nature of pellagra in Italy during the nineteenth century resembles and evokes the similar debate on General Paralysis of the Insane (GPI) that was growing at the same time in the United Kingdom. Pellagra and GPI had a massive and virulent impact on the populations of Italy and the UK, respectively, and contributed to a great extent to the increase and overcrowding of the asylum populations in these countries. This article compares the two illnesses by examining the features of their nosographic positioning, aetiology and pathogenesis. It also documents how doctors arrived at the diagnoses of the two diseases and how this affected their treatment.

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New issue – Social History of Medicine

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The newest issue of Social History of Medicine includes at least two articles that may be of interest to H-madness readers.

Jade Shepherd, “‘I am not very well I feel nearly mad when I think of you”: Male Jealousy, Murder and Broadmoor in Late-Victorian Britain’. The abstract reads:

This article compares the representations of jealousy in popular culture, medical and legal literature, and in the trials and diagnoses of men who murdered or attempted to murder their wives or sweethearts before being found insane and committed into Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum between 1864 and 1900. It is shown that jealousy was entrenched in Victorian culture, but marginalised in medical and legal discourse and in the courtroom until the end of the period, and was seemingly cast aside at Broadmoor. As well as providing a detailed examination of varied representations of male jealousy in late-Victorian Britain, the article contributes to understandings of the emotional lives of the working-class, and the causes and representations of working-class male madness.

Julie M. Powell, ‘Shock Troupe: Medical Film and the Performance of ‘Shell Shock’ for the British Nation at War‘. The abstract reads:

In 1917, physician Arthur F. Hurst began filming the peculiar tics and hysterical gaits of ‘shell-shocked’ soldiers under his care. Editions of Hurst’s films from 1918 and 1940 survive. Cultural products of their time, I argue, the films engaged with contemporary ideas of class, gender and nation. The 1918 version reinforced class-based notions of disease and degeneracy while validating personal and national trauma and bolstering conceptions of masculinity and the nation that were critical to wartime morale and recovery efforts. The 1940 re-edit of the film engaged with the memory of the First World War by constructing a restorative narrative and by erasing the troubled years of gender crisis, ‘shell shock’ culture and class struggle to reassert masculine virtue and martial strength, essential for the prosecution of the Second World War.

This information was retrieved from the blog Advances in the history of psychology.

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