Posts Tagged ‘ 20th century ’

New issue: Social History of Medicine

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The new issue of Social History of Medicine includes at least two articles that could be of interest to H-Madness readers:

Katariina Parhi and Petteri Pietikainen, Socialising the Anti-Social: Psychopathy, Psychiatry and Social Engineering in Finland, 1945–1968.

This article argues that in Finland during the two decades after the Second World War, the diagnosis of psychopathy represented a failed attempt to adjust ‘difficult’ individuals to the social order. Discussing the social and medical character of the diagnosis, we examine psychopathy using the analytic and historical framework of social engineering in post-war Finland. We utilise patient records, official documents and psychiatric publications and analyse the diagnostic uses of psychopathy and its associations with social maladjustment. We also address the question of how mental health care in the less-developed northern part of Finland grappled with behavioural deviance, and especially with behaviour deemed ‘anti-social’. Contextualising psychopathy as a marker of individual disorganisation within the development of social organisation, this article contributes to historical scholarship that maps mental disorders onto the historical development of the nation.

Concepts used by historians are as historical as the diagnoses or categories that are studied. The example of Munchausen syndrome (deceptive presentation of illness in order to adopt the ‘sick role’) is used to explore this. Like most psychiatric diagnoses, Munchausen syndrome is not thought applicable across time by social historians of medicine. It is historically specific, drawing upon twentieth-century anthropology and sociology to explain motivation through desire for the ‘sick role’. Ian Hacking’s concepts of ‘making up people’ and ‘looping effects’ are regularly utilised outside of the context in which they are formed. However, this context is precisely the same anthropological and sociological insight used to explain Munchausen syndrome. It remains correct to resist the projection of Munchausen syndrome into the past. However, it seems inconsistent to use Hacking’s concepts to describe identity formation before the twentieth century as they are given meaning by an identical context.

 

New issue: L’Évolution Psychiatrique

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The new issue of L’Évolution Psychiatrique includes multiple articles related to the history of psychiatry that could be of interest to H-Madness readers:

Jean Garrabé, La place de l’histoire dans l’enseignement de la clinique mentale

Jacques Hochmann, Réflexions sur les rapports entre l’histoire et la psychiatri

Thierry Haustgen, Les psychiatres historiens

Clément Fromentin, Pourquoi faire l’histoire de la psychiatrie ? Le cas de l’Évolution psychiatrique (1925–1985)

Hervé Guillemain, Le retour aux sources. Points de vue sur l’histoire sociale de la psychiatrie et de la maladie mentale

Thomas Lepoutre, La psychiatrie néo-kraepelinienne à l’épreuve de l’histoire. Nouvelles considérations sur la nosologie kraepelinienne

Loig Le Sonn, Le test d’intelligence Binet-Simon dans les asiles (1898–1908). L’invention d’une nouvelle pratique d’interrogatoire

Laurence Guignard, Crime et Psychiatrie. Antoine Léger, le lycanthrope : une étape dans la généalogie des perversions sexuelles (1824–1903)

Emmanuel Delille, Crise d’originalité juvénile ou psychose débutante ? Les représentations de l’adolescence « à risque » après-guerre en France et en Allemagne

Benoît Majerus, Fragilités guerrières – Les fous parisiens dans la Grande Guerre

Pierre Chenivesse and Manuella De Luca, Le théâtre du Grand Guignol et l’aliénisme

 

 

 

Journée d’étude – La psychiatrie: transformations de la prise en charge des patients et de l’institution du XIXe à nos jours (29 septembre 2017, Lyon)

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The seminar ‘La psychiatrie: transformations de la prise en charge des patients et de l’institution du XIXe à nos jours’ could be of interest to H-Madness readers. The event will take place on the 29th of September 2017 in Lyon. Below you find the abstract and the programme of the meeting. More information you can find here or you can contact Pierre Rogez (sfhh-tresorerie@laposte.net).

Résumé

Cette journée nationale est organisée par la Société française d’histoire des hôpitaux et le centre hospitalier du Vinatier à Bron. On s’attachera à décrire les évolutions de la prise en charge des patients à travers les idées d’abord mais surtout à travers l’évolution de l’institution. Au moment du centenaire de la première guerre mondiale il sera important de monter l’incidence des deux gueres mondiales sur les hôpitaux psychiatriques. La deuxième partie de la journée s’attachera à insister sur l’importance de la culture et de l’art dans l’évolution de la prise en charge des patients.

ANNONCE

Axes thématiques

  • les hôpitaux psychiatriques à l’épreuve des deux guerres mondiales: parenthèse ou tournant dans l’histoire de la psychiatrie moderne
  • “anti-aliénistes” et mouvements de patients au 19è siècle: panorama des premières antipsychiatries européennes.
  • mythes et réalités de la déshospitalisation en France (1960-1985)
  • Des premières productions insolites aux ateliers d’art thérapie: regard historique sur la création de l’hôpital psychiatrique.
  • Comment une politique culturelle peut-elle accompagner les transformations d’un hôpital.

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The Richardson History of Psychiatry Research Seminar (Fall 2017, Cornell University)

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The Richardson History of Psychiatry Research Seminar at Cornell University might be of interest to H-Madness readers. The lectures are held in the fall of 2017.

The programme:

September 6
Benjamin Zajicek, Ph.D., Towson University
“Soviet Psychiatrists and ‘The So-Called Traumatic Neuroses of Wartime:’ Medical Practice and Professional Politics in the USSR, 1939-1945”
September 20
Dany Nobus, Ph.D., Brunel University, London
The Madness of Princess Alice: Sigmund Freud and Ernst Simmel at Sanatorium Schloss Tegel”
October 4
Avraham Rot, Ph.D., John Hopkins University
“The Postulate of Anxiety in Freudian Theory, or Why There Are No Boredom Disorders”
October 18
Robert Goldstein, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
“Innateness in Behavioral Science: A Hundreds’ Year War”
November 1
Samuel Scharff, M.D./Ph.D. Candidate, Johns Hopkins
“‘A Glimpse of the Promised Land’: Psychiatry, Law, and the Politics of U.S. Criminal Justice, 1941-1976”
November 15
Thomas Dodman, Ph.D., Boston College
“What Nostalgia Was: Emotions Before Trauma”
November 29
Issues In Mental Health
December 6
Matthew Gambino, M.D., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Chicago
“Mental health and Ideals of Citizenship: Patient Care at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington, D.C., 1903–1962”
December 20
No Seminar — Holiday Party

 

 

 

 

New issue – Genèses

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In the new issue of Genèses their is one article that could be of interest to H-Madness readers: ‘Le syndicalisme à l’heure de la transformation de la psychiatrie. Des militants CGT à l’hôpital psychiatrique du Vinatier (Lyon, années 1960-1970)‘ written by François Alfandari. The abstract reads:

L’hôpital psychiatrique connaît des évolutions profondes au cours de la deuxième moitié du xxe siècle. Au-delà du rôle des médecins ou de l’administration, l’article entend comprendre comment un acteur singulier, la CGT, s’investit dans ces transformations durant les années 1960 et 1970. En saisissant conjointement les contextes de travail et les socialisations militantes, il s’agit de s’intéresser au développement par la CGT de revendications qui portent sur les mutations de la psychiatrie, et de montrer comment certains de ses militants cherchent à en modifier les pratiques.

 

 

New issue – Medical History

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The new issue of Medical History includes one article that could be of interest to H-Madness readers: Angela McCarthy, Catharine Coleborne, Maree O’Connor and Elspeth Knewstubb, ‘Lives in the Asylum Record, 1864 to 1910: Utilising Large Data Collection for Histories of Psychiatry and Mental Health‘. The abstract reads:

This article examines the research implications and uses of data for a large project investigating institutional confinement in Australia and New Zealand. The cases of patients admitted between 1864 and 1910 at four separate institutions, three public and one private, provided more than 4000 patient records to a collaborative team of researchers. The utility and longevity of this data and the ways to continue to understand its significance and contents form the basis of this article’s interrogation of data collection and methodological issues surrounding the history of psychiatry and mental health. It examines the themes of ethics and access, record linkage, categories of data analysis, comparison and record keeping across colonial and imperial institutions, and constraints and opportunities in the data itself. The aim of this article is to continue an ongoing conversation among historians of mental health about the role and value of data collection for mental health and to signal the relevance of international multi-sited collaborative research in this field.

 

Conference report – Madness in Civilization: Current research into the history of psychiatry in the Low Countries

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On the second of June 2017 a symposium was held in Amsterdam about madness in civilization. The conference aim was to evaluate the history of madness in the Netherlands, not only focussing on the historiography of this field but also on new and ongoing research. A recap of the symposium can be found here.

 

 

 

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