Posts Tagged ‘ law ’

The Richardson History of Psychiatry Research Seminar (Fall 2017, Cornell University)

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The Richardson History of Psychiatry Research Seminar at Cornell University might be of interest to H-Madness readers. The lectures are held in the fall of 2017.

The programme:

September 6
Benjamin Zajicek, Ph.D., Towson University
“Soviet Psychiatrists and ‘The So-Called Traumatic Neuroses of Wartime:’ Medical Practice and Professional Politics in the USSR, 1939-1945”
September 20
Dany Nobus, Ph.D., Brunel University, London
The Madness of Princess Alice: Sigmund Freud and Ernst Simmel at Sanatorium Schloss Tegel”
October 4
Avraham Rot, Ph.D., John Hopkins University
“The Postulate of Anxiety in Freudian Theory, or Why There Are No Boredom Disorders”
October 18
Robert Goldstein, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
“Innateness in Behavioral Science: A Hundreds’ Year War”
November 1
Samuel Scharff, M.D./Ph.D. Candidate, Johns Hopkins
“‘A Glimpse of the Promised Land’: Psychiatry, Law, and the Politics of U.S. Criminal Justice, 1941-1976”
November 15
Thomas Dodman, Ph.D., Boston College
“What Nostalgia Was: Emotions Before Trauma”
November 29
Issues In Mental Health
December 6
Matthew Gambino, M.D., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Chicago
“Mental health and Ideals of Citizenship: Patient Care at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington, D.C., 1903–1962”
December 20
No Seminar — Holiday Party

 

 

 

 

New issue – Sciences sociales et santé

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A new issue of Sciences sociales et Santé has appeared and includes two articles that could be of interest to h-madness readers.

Nicolas Henckes, Entre tutelle et assistance : le débat sur la réforme de la loi de 1838 sur les aliénés des années 1870 aux années 1910.

Jean-Christophe Coffin, L’exploration de l’assistance psychiatrique française. Jalons pour une reformulation.

 

 

 

Book Annoucement – Madness in Medieval Law and Custom

TURNER Wendy J. (ed.), Madness in Medieval Law and Custom (Brill, Leiden-Boston, 2010).

This collection of essays opens a new discussion about the mind, body, and spirit of the mad in medieval Europe. The authors examine a broad spectrum of mental and emotional issues, which medieval authors point out as ‘unusual’ behavior. With the emerging field of medieval disability studies in mind, the authors have carefully considered legal and cultural descriptions for insight into the perception and understanding of mental impairment. These essays on madness in the Middle Ages elucidate how medieval society conceptualized mental afflictions. Individually, the essays cover aspects of mental impairment from a variety of angles to unearth collectively medieval perspectives on mental affliction.
Contributors are James R. King, Kate McGrath, Irina Metzler, Aleksandra Pfau, Cory James Rushton, Margaret Trenchard-Smith, and Wendy J. Turner.

United States v. Comstock

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments last month in the case of the United States v. Comstock.  The case involves establishing the limits of the state’s power to use civil commitment law to institutionalize sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences.  While the case heard before the Supreme Court largely centers on the more or less technical matter of whether the federal government may usurp individual states’ rights in this regard, it has brought national media attention to a development that has been on the rise on both sides of the Atlantic – the use of commitment laws and/or psychiatric facilities to detain convicts, most without a readily apparent diagnosis.  Over the course of the 20th century, countries have adopted a variety of approaches to this issue:  the Institution for Psychopathic Criminals in Denmark, social-therapeutic facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany, and, more recently, long-stay facilities in the Netherlands.

Read the transcript of the Supreme Court hearing here:  http://www.supremecourtus.gov/oral_arguments/argument_transcripts/08-1224.pdf

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