Query: Post-Partum Depression in the Nineteenth and Early-Twentieth Centuries

One of our H-Madness subscribers has the following query. Replies can be made either in the comments section or by responding via email.

I am currently working on a study of treatment of the mentally ill in New England/United States during the period 1870-1940. While I am quite familiar with secondary sources on the general topic, I’m hoping someone in H-Madness can help with this question:
Has anyone come across a narrative history of the treatment of what we would today call post-partum depression in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries?  I’m specifically looking for material on the US but secondary studies of western European nations would also be helpful.
Thanks. 
Suzanne 

smccormack@ccri.edu

 

Suzanne K. McCormack, PhD
Professor of History
Dept of Social Sciences
Community College of Rhode Island

4 thoughts on “Query: Post-Partum Depression in the Nineteenth and Early-Twentieth Centuries

  1. Jonathan Sadowsky says:

    Try Rachel Louise Moran at the University of North Texas. She is working on the history of PPD and may know what’s available for your period.

  2. rachellouisemoran says:

    Period medical journals have some interesting narratives, though only from a clinician perspective of course, for puerperal madness/mania in the early 20th century. Send me an email for cites. I can’t think of much from a patient’s perspective in these years, but it’s also mostly earlier than I’m working.

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