Author Archive

PhD positions: ERC project BodyCapital

Societies, actors and government in Europe, SAGE UMR7363
ERC BodyCapital
Call for PhD funding applications

The ERC Advanced Grant programme “The healthy self as body capital: individuals, market-based societies and body politics in visual twentieth century Europe (BodyCapital)” led by Christian Bonah (Université de Strasbourg) and Anja Laukötter (MPIHD, Berlin) on the understanding of body capital and its history, through the twentieth century history of visual mass media (film, TV, Internet) and inédits (amateur, family and private visuals) is now accepting applications for up to 3 three-year PhD positions.

The application deadline is 20 May 2017.
Interviews will be scheduled on the Monday 26 June 2017 in Strasbourg (in-person interviews will be preferential, with some travel funding provided upon request). The contracts will begin 1 September 2017.

Project description:
Do you know how much rapid eye movement (REM) sleep you need to work efficiently, do you look at food labels to ensure that you are getting all the required vitamins and minerals or know someone who uses a step counter to know if they are getting enough physical activity? These are just a few examples of our perceptions of health and the resulting individual practices in twentieth century Europe. In fact, this century may be characterized by the development of products and techniques for the body and its health. Bodily health has evolved as a new form of capital (Bourdieu 1979): a form of symbolic capital that can be transformed into economic capital. These are not only witnessed by, but contributed to and were affected by, a flood of visual media that circulated transnationally in the advent of a media society. Thus at the center of the research group investigations are moving images that are oriented towards the idea of informing, improving or educating on life and health. Continue reading

New Issue – L’esprit créateur

L'Esprit_Fall12_Covers.qxpThe winter issue 2016 of the journal “L’esprit créateur”, coordinated by Florence Vatan and Anne Vila, is entitled L’esprit (dé)réglé: Literature, Science, and the Life of the Mind in France, 1700–1900. It contains the following articles:

L’esprit (dé)réglé: Literature, Science, and the Life of the Mind in France, 1700–1900 by Florence Vatan and Anne Vila. The abstract reads:

The case studies presented in this special issue illustrate the unique appeal that the puzzle of the mind exerted across fields of knowledge in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. They highlight the diversity of approaches and perspectives that the exploration of the mind elicited in literature, philosophy, and the sciences de l’homme. They also testify to the conceptual challenges and persistent nebulousness that surrounded the notion of esprit and its close associates. That fluidity of meaning was, in its way, productive: it provoked debates about the nature of the self, the precarious status of consciousness, and the relevance of human exceptionalism.

Continue reading

Conference – Spectacular Evidence: Theatres of the Observed Mind

rtaimage

24 Mar 2017 – 11am to 6pm

A one-day symposium, Spectacular Evidence, will include presentations, performances, screenings and talks from the fields of visual art, medicine and critical theory.

Drawing upon histories of madness and its exhibition, and considering how it has been staged as cultural performance, this event will consider behaviours and ‘performances’ exchanged between viewer and physician in relation to patient.

Confirmed contributors to the event include:
Caterina Albano
Sal Anderson
Monika Ankele
Zoe Beloff
Rosemary Cronin
Eddy Dreadnought
Michelle Williams Gamaker
Anna Harpin
Zoe Mendelson
Joanne Morra
Florence Peake

Convened by Dr Zoë Mendelson and presented by Camberwell, Chelsea, Wimbledon Graduate School Public Programme.

The symposium will take place at ArtsAdmin, Toynbee Studios, London, on 24 March 2017.

Booking via http://www.artsadmin.co.uk/.

Call for Abstracts – Alcohol, Psychiatry and Society

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International Research Symposium – St Anne’s College, Oxford, 29 – 30 June 2017

The medicalisation of alcohol use has become a prominent discourse that guides policy makers and impacts public perceptions of alcohol and drinking. This symposium intends to map the historical and cultural dimensions of these phenomena. Emphasis is on medical attitudes and theories regarding alcohol and the changing perception of alcohol consumption in the fields of psychiatry and mental healing. The intention is to explore the shift from the use of alcohol in clinical treatment, as part of dietary regimens, incentive to work and reward for desirable behaviour during earlier periods to the emergence of alcoholism as a disease category that requires medical intervention, is covered by medical insurance and considered as a threat to public health. Continue reading

Thinking in Cases – call for submissions to History of the Human Sciences

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

Dialogue with John Forrester’s work in a special issue of HHS

As part of our celebration of the work of the incomparable John Forrester, History of the Human Sciences (HHS) is hosting a review symposium around John’s final work: Thinking in Cases (Polity: 2017). The first essay in this collectionwas originally published in HHS back in 1996: (http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/095269519600900301)

As part of our efforts to showcase the work of new and emerging scholars, HHS invites expressions of interest from all early career researchers (a flexible definition) whose work bears in some way upon the work John started with ‘Thinking in Cases’. We welcome anyone who would like to contribute to such a dialogue with John’s work, and with each other.

If interested, please send a short expression of interest (max 200 words) to the email address below, outlining your strengths as candidate for inclusion in such a review symposium. Depending upon response, we anticipate final contributions of c.3,000 words.

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Deadlines:

Expressions of Interest: Monday 13th March, 2017.

Submission of Contributions: 31st October, 2017.

Publication in HHS: 2018.

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If you have questions, please email Chris Millard: c[dot]millard[at]Sheffield[dot]ac[dot]uk

We look forward to hearing from you,

Felicity Callard (Editor-in-Chief) & Chris Millard (Reviews Editor)

New Issue – History of Psychiatry

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Today Bangour Village, one of the famous Scottish asylums of the 20th century, is completely abandoned. Photo by Mark Sutherland

The March 2017 issue of History of Psychiatry is now out. Chris Philo and Jonathan Andrews, as guest editors, have compiled a special issue entitled Histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland.

“Introduction: histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland,” by Chris Philo and Jonathan Andrews. The abstract reads:

This paper introduces a special issue on ‘Histories of asylums, insanity and psychiatry in Scotland’, situating the papers that follow in an outline historiography of work in this field. Using Allan Beveridge’s claims in 1993 about the relative lack of research on the history of psychiatry in Scotland, the paper reviews a range of contributions that have emerged since then, loosely distinguishing between ‘overviews’ – work addressing longer-term trends and broader periods and systems – and more detailed studies of particular ‘individuals and institutions’. There remains much still to do, but the present special issue signals what is currently being achieved, not least by a new generation of scholars in and on Scotland.

Continue reading

New Issue – Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte

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The first 2017 issue of Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte is now out and includes at least one article that may be of interest to H-Madness readers.

Claudia Moisel: Geschichte und Psychoanalyse. Zur Genese der Bindungstheorie von John Bowlby

Die Geschichte der Psychoanalyse sowie psychologisch-psychiatrische Expertendiskurse werden im angloamerikanischen Sprachraum gegenwärtig vielfältig erforscht, auch im Kontext der dezidiert interdisziplinär angelegten und rasch expandierenden „Childhood Studies“. Der Beitrag erläutert diese Zusammenhänge am Beispiel der laufenden Forschung zur Bindungstheorie des renommierten britischen Kinderpsychiaters John Bowlby. Bowlbys einflussreiche Studien über Heimkinder für die Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) etablieren in den fünfziger Jahren „Mutterentbehrung“ (Deprivation) als zentrale Analysekategorie der frühen Kindheit; sein eingängiges Erklärungsangebot zur Entstehung und Prävention psychischer Probleme entfaltete in der Familienpolitik große Wirkung. Der Beitrag verfolgt darüber hinaus das Ziel, das Verhältnis von Geschichte und den „Psychowissenschaften“ in zweifacher Hinsicht methodisch auszuloten, nämlich zum einen den Konstruktionscharakter psychologischer, psychiatrischer und psychoanalytischer Konzepte sichtbar zu machen, zum anderen Aufmerksamkeit zu generieren für eine Fülle zeithistorischer relevanter Quellen und Literatur, die in diesen Zusammenhängen entstanden ist, aber in der Forschung zu wenig Berücksichtigung findet.

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