Archive for the ‘ Uncategorized ’ Category

New book – Nineteenth Century American Asylums. A History in Postcards

deese_cw.jpg

The book Nineteenth Century American Asylums. A History in Postcards could be of interest to h-madness readers. The volume is written by Alma Wynelle Deese & Cathy Faye. The abstract reads:

In the nineteenth century, several institutions were established in the United States to house and care for the mentally ill. By 1880, 139 “asylums” and “mental hospitals” had been created using both private and public funds, and by 1890, every state had built one or more publicly supported mental hospitals. Although early American asylums were often underfunded and crowded, they were often one of the few options for those suffering from mental illness. These large and grandiose facilities could therefore serve as a place of refuge. In addition, these asylums were significant places for research and teaching in early medicine, psychiatry, and psychology.

Postcard production blossomed in the late 1800s and early 1900s, coinciding with the establishment of many “state lunatic hospitals.” Featuring more than 300 images of early public and private asylums as presented in picture postcards, this book offers a fascinating view of these grand structures, the expansive grounds and gardens they occupied, and their unique architectural features. The images are accompanied by brief historical descriptions of each institution, along with information about their current status. Together, the images and text offer the reader an opportunity to explore the space and places of early mental health care of the United States.

This information was retrieved from the Advances in the History of Psychology blog.

 

 

Dissertations – Madness in Early Modern England

Alison R. Brown: “Though Troubled Be My Brain:” Madness in Early Modern England, 1603-1714

This dissertation is a study of madness in Stuart-Era England. Madness was pervasive in early modern England; it was in the streets, performed on stage, discussed in political pamphlets and legal treatises, and physically housed in Bethlehem Hospital. Madness, therefore, serves as a significant lens because in differentiating between madness and sanity, contemporaries regularly drew clear boundaries between acceptable, or “normal” behavior, and unacceptable, or “abnormal” behavior, that was particular to seventeenth-century English culture and society. Specifically, I argue that madness serves as a channel to examine the diagnoses and treatment of mental disorders that contemporaries believed altered the body and mind, the legal repercussions of abnormal behavior at the state and local level, and the use of corporeal rhetoric in political culture.

Ranters Declaration

Frontispiece of “The Ranters Declaration” (1650). The Ranters were a radical religious and political group that emerged during the mid-century crisis in England. Many critics of their movement described them as “The Mad Crew.”

In studying the diagnoses and treatments of diseases that altered the body and mind, we encounter contemporaries negotiating between the boundaries of madness and sanity in familial and community relationships, their choice of medical practitioner, their conception of the mind-body relationship, and the ways in which the interplay between natural and supernatural beliefs affected medicinal practices. In negotiating the boundaries between madness and sanity in gender relations, the law, and political culture, we encounter representations of the mad such as “Tom of Bedlam” and “Mad Bess,” recognizable characters in poems, riddles, and ballads. Representations of the mad and madness itself formed discursive elements in philosophy, religious nonconformity, gendered language, legal statutes, Personal Acts of Parliament, inquisitions of lunacy, the symbolism of “undress,” or nakedness, and in political propaganda meant to delegitimize opposing parties. Therefore, the ways in which contemporaries recognized, interpreted, and managed madness provides insight into aspects of English society colored by divisions between acceptable and unacceptable behavior.

Before public institutions for the insane were founded specifically for that purpose, family or community-based care was the norm for the mad, in addition to the few private madhouses that were founded by private entrepreneurs during the last half of the seventeenth century. With no bureaucratic system of recordkeeping, source limitations seemingly restricted historians to the period starting a century and a half later when public asylums were built. Consequently, this dissertation draws on a wide variety of sources in order to creatively circumvent this problem, including manuscripts, parish records, land commissions, autobiography, spiritual biography, criminal cases, political pamphlets, doctors’ notes, medical guidebooks, and more.

Alison R. Brown is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University working with Professor Melinda S. Zook.

Contact: brown923@purdue.edu

 

Merken

Call for Collaborators for h-madness

screenshot-from-2017-02-10-10-08-58

As announced in January, h-madness is embarking on a set of major changes to the website and its management. It is our belief that it is time for the site to take on a more lively feel and for a wider and diverse circle of specialists in the field to be involved in generating content for h-madness.

This means, among other things, bringing on board scholars from all stages in their careers and from across the world. To that end, we are issuing a general Call for Collaborators. More specifically, we invite scholars conducting research, writing, and/or teaching on the subject of the history of madness and mental health who are interested in becoming involved in helping to run h-madness to submit a statement of their interest in one or more of the following positions:

1. H-Madness Advisory Board

The advisory board’s main job will be to serve as a resource for the senior editors and, similar to most academic journals, will be composed of more or less senior scholars in the field. Board member involvement will likely be only occasional, perhaps receiving no more than 4-5 emails/year.

2. Section Editors

Section editors will be involved in h-madness on a weekly – and, at times, perhaps a daily – basis, responsible for writing, editing, and posting content (this includes soliciting contributions from scholars in the field). Section editors may be at most any stage in their careers (from advanced doctoral students to senior scholars).

3. Editorial Assistants

The responsibility of editorial assistants will be to aid the senior editors and the section editors in their work. While most of their responsibilities will involve correspondence and website management, they also will be encouraged to generate content. Doctoral students – particularly those early on in their studies – interested in getting involved in h-madness should apply for these positions.

If you have an interest in joining h-madness in any of these capacities, submit a brief statement of interest (no more than 1-3 paragraphs) and a cv to <hpsychiatry [at] gmail.com> by March 6. And, of course, if you have any questions, feel free to contact us.

The Editors

7th Anniversary of h-madness: Upcoming Changes

To All Our Readers and Contributors:

Today marks the seventh anniversary of h-madness. When we began this blog in 2010, we started it in the knowledge that there was great interest in the history of mental health and psychiatry out there as well as a vibrant and innovative community of scholars. Up to that point, however, we had no online site where those of us engaged in the study of the history of madness could exchange timely information about meetings, events, publications, and interests. Over the years, we have not only circulated the details about conferences, articles, and books, but also posted book reviews, film reviews, reviews of exhibitions, and autobiographical commentaries.

It has not escaped our notice, however, that over the recent past the blog has been primarily limited to reporting on upcoming conferences and talks and new publications. It is our belief, however, that the strength of an online site lies in its ability to offer far more dynamic and unconventional opportunities for professional communication.

For that reason, over the coming months, we will be revamping the website and enhancing its content. Among other things, this will likely involve migrating the website to a university server and reorganizing the site’s administration.

In addition, we will be recruiting new contributors. In the near future, we will issue a more formal Call for Collaborators. But if you are interested in getting actively involved in h-madness, please feel free to get in touch with us at <hpsychiatry [at] gmail.com>.

Stay tuned for me details as things progress. And keep in mind that the editors here at h-madness are always eager to hear your thoughts on how to make the site better. So please contact us to share your ideas.

Best,
The Editors

CfP Special Issue on the History of Global Psychology and Psychiatry

History of Psychology invites submissions for a special issue on the history of psychology and psychiatry in the global world.

Until recently, historical research in the history of psychology and psychiatry tended to focus on the development of these disciplines in the western world exclusively. When the rest of the world was taken into account, it was often portrayed as the recipient of western insights and not as a place where psychological and psychiatric knowledge originated or where practitioners made genuine contributions to both fields. Over the past two or three decades, historians of psychiatry have devoted ample energy to the history of colonial psychiatry, analyzing developments in the non-western world. Historians of psychology, however, have arguably paid less attention to developments in the non-western world.

In this special issue, we seek to consolidate and extend the historical analysis of psychology and psychiatry beyond the Atlantic or western world. We welcome original contributions on initiatives and developments in the colonial era. In addition, we seek to expand historical interest in the post-colonial era, starting with the Cold War and coming up to the present.

The submission deadline is May 15, 2017.

The main text of each manuscript, exclusive of figures, tables, references, or appendices, should not exceed 35 double spaced pages (approximately 7,500 words). Initial inquiries regarding the special issue may be sent to the guest editors, Hans Pols (University of Sydney) <hans.pols@sydney.edu.au> and Harry Yi-Liu Wu (University of Hong Kong) <hylw@hku.hk> or the regular editor, Nadine Weidman <hop.editor@icloud.com>.

Manuscripts should be submitted through the History of Psychology Manuscript Submission Portal with a cover letter indicating that the paper is to be considered for the special issue. Please see the Instructions to Authors information located on the History of Psychology website.

 

CfP: Symposium on the doctor-patient relationship (Oxford, March 2017)

An interdisciplinary symposium, 24 March 2017, University of Oxford
dp2017-logo
Call for Papers
 

Indian doctor taking the pulse of a patient. Gouache drawing. (Wellcome Library, London.) Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons.
“Two distinct and separate parties interact with one another – not one mind (the physician’s), not one body (the patient’s), but two minds and two bodies.”
– Jay Katz, The Silent World of Doctor and Patient (1984)
The doctor-patient relationship is the primary way that we experience medicine: we go to the doctor when we are sick, think we may be sick, or are scared of becoming sick. Healthcare is constructed around encounters between practitioners and patients, and the relationship between them is integral to how medicine is practised, experienced, and represented around the world. It may be paternalistic or a partnership of equals, underpinned by acts of care and compassion or negligence and abuse.
In a one-day symposium on Friday 24 March 2017, we will explore the different ways in which encounters between medical practitioners and patients have been imagined or conceptualised across different historical and cultural contexts.
How has our understanding of these interactions been affected by factors such as scientific and technological advances, urbanisation, and increased patient demand? By interrogating these idiosyncratic and complex personal and professional relationships, how can we better understand broad themes, such as the professionalisation of medicine or the politics of identity? The doctor often tells us a great deal about the patient: but what can the patient tell us about the doctor?
We encourage proposals for 20-minute papers from scholars with an interest in medical humanities working across different disciplines, e.g. arts, humanities, social sciences, and medicine. While papers on the history of medicine in British and North American contexts are welcome, we would also like to hear from scholars working in languages other than English, and on areas of the world beyond Britain and North America.
Possible topics could include, but are not limited to:
  • Representations of practitioners and patients in literature, visual arts, and film;
  • Different types of medical practitioners, e.g. nurses, dentists, midwives;
  • History of emotions: the affect of the medical encounter;
  • Whose voice? Patient narratives and case histories;
  • Living with diseases of the age: nervous attacks, melancholia, hysteria, shell-shock;
  • Doctors, patients and identity politics: gender, sexuality, race, class;
  • Professionalisation, power and authority;
  • Experiencing and/or practising colonial, imperial, and indigenous medicine;
  • Medical encounters in the institution: hospitals, workhouses, prisons, asylums;
  • Psychiatry and mental health;
  • Medicine, the state, and its citizens;
  • The material culture surrounding doctor-patient relationships.
Proposals should be no more than 300 words in length and a short biography should be included in addition. Please submit them to doctorpatient17@torch.ox.ac.uk by 30 November 2016.
This one-day symposium is funded by The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH) through a Medical Humanities Programme Grant and the Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project Constructing Scientific Communities.
torch-logo    Web    ahrc-logo

Book announcement: Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After

cover-image-v-2

Peter Leese and Jason Crouthamel, editors, Traumatic Memories of the Second World War and After (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)

This collection investigates the social and cultural history of trauma to offer a comparative analysis of its individual, communal, and political effects in the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to witness testimony, to procedures of personal memory and collective commemoration, and to visual sources as they illuminate the changing historical nature of trauma. The essays draw on diverse methodologies, including oral history, and use varied sources such as literature, film and the broadcast media. The contributions discuss imaginative, communal and political responses, as well as the ways in which the later welfare of traumatized individuals is shaped by medical, military, and civilian institutions. Incorporating innovative methodologies and offering a thorough evaluation of current research, the book shows new directions in historical trauma studies.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: