Posts Tagged ‘ ancient history ’

New book – A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought

9781316628133

The book A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought could be of interest to H-Madness readers. The book is written by Chiara Thumiger and is published by Cambridge University Press. The abstract on the publishers website reads: 

The Hippocratic texts and other contemporary medical sources have often been overlooked in discussions of ancient psychology. They have been considered to be more mechanical and less detailed than poetic and philosophical representations, as well as later medical texts such as those of Galen. This book does justice to these early medical accounts by demonstrating their richness and sophistication, their many connections with other contemporary cultural products and the indebtedness of later medicine to their observations. In addition, it reads these sources not only as archaeological documents but also in the light of methodological discussions that are fundamental to the histories of psychiatry and psychology. As a result of this approach, the book will be important for scholars of these disciplines as well as those of Greek literature and philosophy, strongly advocating the relevance of ancient ideas to modern debates.

 

This information was retrieved from the website Historiens de la santé

 

New Book: C. Thumiger, A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought

 

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Historian Chiara Thumiger – Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Fellow in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick and a Gastwissenschaftlerin in the Department of Classical Philology at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin – has just published a new book with Cambridge University Press entitled A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought. The description reads:

The Hippocratic texts and other contemporary medical sources have often been overlooked in discussions of ancient psychology. They have been considered to be more mechanical and less detailed than poetic and philosophical representations, as well as later medical texts such as those of Galen. This book does justice to these early medical accounts by demonstrating their richness and sophistication, their many connections with other contemporary cultural products and the indebtedness of later medicine to their observations. In addition, it reads these sources not only as archaeological documents but also in the light of methodological discussions that are fundamental to the histories of psychiatry and psychology. As a result of this approach, the book will be important for scholars of these disciplines as well as those of Greek literature and philosophy, strongly advocating the relevance of ancient ideas to modern debates.

 

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