Dworkin: The Rise of the Caring Industry

Ronald W. Dworkin – Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law and Philosophy at New York University and Jeremy Bentham Professor of Law and Philosophy at University College London – has a piece entitled “The Rise of the Caring Industry” in the June 2010 issue of Policy Review.  The essay can be accessed online here.  The author of the 2006 book Artificial Happiness: The Dark Side of the New Happy Class considers how the growth of the helping professions (particularly those concerned with mental health) represents not simply an institutional change, but a shift in ethos.  As he puts it:

In this way the caring industry exercises a double fascination — on the one hand as a sounding board for lonely, unhappy individuals, and on the other as emblematic of a new ethos of civilization. The age of caring is a more skeptical age, but also a more tolerant one, expressing a distrust of authority and an antipathy to old enthusiasms that wavers between laughter and disgust. It would be wrong to say that people today deny the world; they simply prefer to ignore it, presenting a blank wall of indifference to how people live and what they believe. They prefer meeting their psychological needs through a therapy session rather than through a community of blood brothers.

The topic has been of particular interest to observers in the United States, and, over the past fifteen years, a number of scholars and writers have written on the subject, including Ellen Herman (The Romance of American Psychology: Political Culture in the Age of Experts, 1995), Eva Moskowitz (In Therapy We Trust: America’s Obsession with Self-Fulfillment, 2001) and Barbara Ehrenreich (Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America, 2009).

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