“Writing Madness” – BBC Radio 4

Currently streaming on BBC Radio 4 is a programme entitled “Writing Madness” that explores the links between modern psychiatric thought and great works of fiction.

Contributors include psychotherapist and essayist Adam Philips, leading psychiatrist Simon Wessely, cultural historian Lisa Appignanesi and Chris Thompson, psychiatrist and medical director of The Priory.

The website offers us a taste of the programme:

How did modern literary and psychiatric ideas meet and how did each shape the other? Do these heroines show literature of the period to be a critical – and even emancipating – force…or is fiction really medicine’s stooge? Novels on the couch include Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway….interestingly with both novels there’s a tendency to base the heroines on real people – Nicole Diver is based on the case history of Fitzgerald’s own wife Zelda, whereas Woolf’s Mrs.Dalloway comes very close in literary terms to what Freud calls ‘self-analysis’ – one difference is that Woolf sometimes believed ‘madness’ was necessary to be creative, while Scott Fitzgerald depicted it as disastrous drain on creativity (ie. his). And both novels have the dynamic and lucrative new industry of psychotherapy in their sights. Vivienne compares fiction in the age of Freud to literary ideas of mental health in the Victorian age and in Dickens specifically, using Great Expectations’ Miss Havisham as a case study.

Click here to stream the 30-minute clips.

    • thebrightoldoak
    • March 30th, 2012

    Thanks for highlighting this programme!

  1. My most apt blog for this topic would be http://clarespark.com/2011/11/12/the-woman-question-in-saul-bellows-herzog/. Too often, modern women have been deemed crazy simply because of their conceptual clarity and the imputed see-through-men female gaze. And Herman Melville was deemed crazy by his family because he exposed family double binds.

    • Centre for Medical Humanities
    • April 1st, 2012
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