Posts Tagged ‘ Film ’

New issue – Social History of Medicine

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The newest issue of Social History of Medicine includes at least two articles that may be of interest to H-madness readers.

Jade Shepherd, “‘I am not very well I feel nearly mad when I think of you”: Male Jealousy, Murder and Broadmoor in Late-Victorian Britain’. The abstract reads:

This article compares the representations of jealousy in popular culture, medical and legal literature, and in the trials and diagnoses of men who murdered or attempted to murder their wives or sweethearts before being found insane and committed into Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum between 1864 and 1900. It is shown that jealousy was entrenched in Victorian culture, but marginalised in medical and legal discourse and in the courtroom until the end of the period, and was seemingly cast aside at Broadmoor. As well as providing a detailed examination of varied representations of male jealousy in late-Victorian Britain, the article contributes to understandings of the emotional lives of the working-class, and the causes and representations of working-class male madness.

Julie M. Powell, ‘Shock Troupe: Medical Film and the Performance of ‘Shell Shock’ for the British Nation at War‘. The abstract reads:

In 1917, physician Arthur F. Hurst began filming the peculiar tics and hysterical gaits of ‘shell-shocked’ soldiers under his care. Editions of Hurst’s films from 1918 and 1940 survive. Cultural products of their time, I argue, the films engaged with contemporary ideas of class, gender and nation. The 1918 version reinforced class-based notions of disease and degeneracy while validating personal and national trauma and bolstering conceptions of masculinity and the nation that were critical to wartime morale and recovery efforts. The 1940 re-edit of the film engaged with the memory of the First World War by constructing a restorative narrative and by erasing the troubled years of gender crisis, ‘shell shock’ culture and class struggle to reassert masculine virtue and martial strength, essential for the prosecution of the Second World War.

This information was retrieved from the blog Advances in the history of psychology.

Seventh European Psychoanalytic Film Festival @ Institute of Psychoanalysis (London)

This October 31, the European Psychoanalytic Film Festival returns with some of the boldest, most thought provoking voices from European cinema in recent years.

‘Secrets’ is the theme that unites our films this year – and one that guarantees a series of lively discussions as screenings bring you face to face with both directors and prominent psychoanalysts.

Since its inaugural year in 2001, epff has been bringing together psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, filmmakers, academics, critics, students and film enthusiasts under one roof.

And once again, over four days of films, lectures, round-table discussions and a packed social schedule, we aim to foster creative dialogue and illuminate new pathways between the arts and theories of the mind.

If you have an interest in cinema and the many ways it can be enriched through psychoanalytical perspectives, this is an event not to be missed.

For more information, click here.

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