Upcoming UCL events on history of psychiatry and psychoanalysis

Two upcoming events at the UCL Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines:

PROFESSOR MARK MICALE: A GLOBAL HISTORY OF TRAUMA
UCL, Tuesday 16th June 2015, 6-7.30pm

Historical trauma studies continue to burgeon, but the work in this
flourishing field of scholarship is derived from a small number of
purely Euro-American catastrophic events, which serve as historical and
psychological paradigms. Micale, who contributed to earlier debates in
the field with his edited collection Traumatic Pasts: History, 
Psychiatry, and Trauma in the Modern Age, 1870-1930, argues that
scholars need now to look beyond the West toward a new, more genuinely
global perspective on the history of trauma. He focuses in particular on
new research being done about Asia.

PSYCHOANALYTIC FILIATIONS: MAPPING THE PSYCHOANALYTIC MOVEMENT
UCL, Saturday 18th July 2015 2-6pm

How does one write the history of the psychoanalytic movement? This
event marks the publication of Ernst Falzeder’s book, Psychoanalytic
Filiations: Mapping the Psychoanalytic Movement (Karnac Books), with a
series of debates and discussions on this theme.

Written over a span of nearly a quarter century, the “red thread”
running through the book is the network of psychoanalytic “filiations”
(who analysed whom), and how crucial concepts of depth psychology were
developed before the background of those intense relationships: for
example, Freud’s technical recommendations, the therapeutic use of
countertransference and the view of the psychoanalytic situation as a
social, interactive process, the introduction of the anal phase, the
birth of the object-relations-model as opposed to the drive-model in
psychoanalysis, or the psychotherapeutic treatment of psychoses. Several
chapters deal with key figures in that history, such as Sándor Ferenczi,
Karl Abraham, Eugen Bleuler, Otto Rank, and C. G. Jung, their respective
relationships to each other and to Freud, and the consequences that
their collaboration, as well as conflicts, with him had for the further
development of psychoanalysis up to the present day. Other chapters give
an overview on the publications of Freud’s texts and on unpublished
documents (the “unknown Freud”), the editorial policy of the
publications of Freud’s letters.

Discussants:

Dr. Ernst Falzeder (UCL)
Dr. Shaul Bar-Heim (Birkbeck College)
Arthur Eaton (UCL)
Dr. Matt ffytche (University of Essex)
Prof. Brett Kahr (Roehampton University)
Dr. Sarah Marks (University of Cambridge)
Dee McQuillan (UCL)
Dr. Richard Skues (London Metropolitan University)
Chair: Prof. Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

Full details and registration online here:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/ucl-centre-for-the-history-of-psychological-disciplines-4646137887

One thought on “Upcoming UCL events on history of psychiatry and psychoanalysis

  1. Christine says:

    Reblogged this on Freud in Oceania and commented:
    Here is an opportunity to attend a seminar about Ernst Falzeder’s new book, ‘Psychoanalytic Filiations: Mapping the Psychoanalytic Movement ( Karnac), at UCL on 18 July 2015. An interview with Falzeder about this work, published in Cabinet magazine is located at this link:http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/20/falzeder.php Falzeder’s work prompts reflection about Australia’s own psychoanalytic genealogy and the way this has shaped the psychoanalytic stance and thought. How has the Hungarian School, Ferenczi and Clara Geroe’s analyst, Michael Balint shaped the approach to analysis in the eastern states? What is the influence of Anna Freud in Western Australia and, as the children of Empire returned from England after training as Kleinian analysts and therapists another wave of thought washed across the continent? And as psychoanalysts arrived from Argentina in the 1970s, Lacanian analysis provided another trajectory of thought. More recent, perhaps, is the turning to indigenous thought and philosophy for what we can learn about the mind.

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